Vocal Cord Dysfunction

(Paradoxical vocal chord movement disorder)

A vocal cord dysfunction is more common in women aged 20-40. The etiology is unclear, but it seems to be related to anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and personality disorders in context. It is not as a factitious disorder (i. E. Patients do not do it consciously) is considered.

A paradoxical or dysfunctional vocal chord movement is defined as an adduction of the vocal cords during inhalation and abduction during exhalation; characterized airway obstruction and wheezing caused inspiratory which are often mistaken for asthma. The vocal cord paralysis (unilateral and bilateral) is discussed elsewhere. The general assessment of patients with stridor is discussed elsewhere. A vocal cord dysfunction is more common in women aged 20-40. The etiology is unclear, but it seems to be related to anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and personality disorders in context. It is not as a factitious disorder (i. E. Patients do not do it consciously) is considered. The symptoms are usually inspiratory stridor and less often expiratory wheezing. To the other manifestations of hoarseness, throat tightness, choking and coughing may include (1). The diagnosis is made by the detection of an inspiratory laryngoscopic closure of the vocal folds. Sometimes the diagnosis of vocal cord dysfunction is only made after asthma was diagnosed in patients incorrectly and these have then failed to respond to bronchodilators or corticosteroids. The therapy consists of patient education, speech therapy training in special breathing techniques (eg. As Hechelatmung) that provide relief for attacks of stridor and obstruction, and avoiding the misdiagnosis and erroneous treatment of asthma. A vocal cord dysfunction, which is associated with a psychiatric diagnosis, is often resistant to such measures. In these cases the Kosultation a therapist is recommended. Note 1. Christopher KL. Wood, II RP Eckert RC, et al: vocal cord dysfunction presenting as asthma. N Engl J Med 308: 1566-1570., 1983

Health Life Media Team

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