Vitiligo is the loss of skin melanocytes with circumscribed depigmented skin areas of different sizes. The cause of vitilgo is unknown but is likely based on genetic and autoimmune factors. The diagnosis is usually clear from the skin findings. Popular treatments include topical corticosteroids (often with calcipotriol combined), calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus and pimecrolimus), and narrow-band ultraviolet (UV) B psoralen and UVA If large areas are affected, the disease may respond to narrowband UVB treatment. In heavy, substantial area pigment loss remains of healthy skin can permanently monobenzyl ether or hydroquinone depigmented (bleached) are. An Operational skin transfer may also be taken into consideration for

Vitiligo is the loss of skin melanocytes with defined depigmented skin areas of different sizes. The cause is unknown but is likely based on genetic and autoimmune factors. The diagnosis is usually clear from the skin findings.
Common treatments include topical corticosteroids (often with calcipotriol combined), calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus and pimecrolimus), and narrow-band ultraviolet (UV) B psoralen and UVA If large areas are affected, the disease may respond to narrowband UVB treatment. In heavy, large area pigment loss remains of normal skin can permanently monobenzyl ether or hydroquinone depigmented (bleached) are. An Operational skin transfer may (See also Overview pigmentation.) Are also contemplated for Vitiligo affects up to 2% of the population.

The Cause
The reason for Vitilgo is unclear, but melanocytes are missing in the affected areas. Proposed mechanisms include autoimmune destruction of melanocytes, reduced survival of the primary melanocytes and melanocytes defects. Vitiligo can occur familial (autosomal dominant with incomplete penetrance and variable expression) or acquired. Some patients have antibodies to melanin. Up to 30% of other autoantibodies (adrenal cells and parietal cells against thyroglobulin,) or clinical endocrine autoimmune diseases are adrenal related (Addison’s disease, diabetes mellitus], pernicious anemia, and thyroid dysfunction). However, this correlation is unproven and may also accidentally. The most explicit linkage is with hyperthyroidism (Graves’ disease) and hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s thyroiditis). Vitiligo occasionally occurs after a direct physical injury to the skin (z. B. in response to sunburn). Patients can associate the incidence of vitiligo with emotional stress.

Symptoms and complaints Vitiligo is characterized by hypopigmented or depigmented areas that are present usually sharply demarcated and often symmetric. The depigmentation can be one or two places, or whole body sections relate (segmental vitiligo); be rarely generalized and almost the entire skin concern (universal vitiligo). However, the Vitiligo affects mostly face (v. a. periorifiziell), fingers, back of the hand, wrist flexor surfaces, elbows, knees, shins, dorsal side of the ankle, armpits, groin, anogenital, navel and nipples. In particular, dark-skinned people may be cosmetically heavily damaged. The hair in vitiliginösen areas is normally white.

What is Vitiligo?

Health Life Media Team

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