Roots and rhizomes of valerian (Valeriana officinalis) contain active ingredients, including valepotriates and pungent-smelling oils.

(See also nutritional supplements Overview.) Roots and rhizomes of valerian (Valeriana officinalis) contain active ingredients, including valepotriates and pungent-smelling oils. Allegations Valerian is used as a sedative and sleep aid and is especially popular in Europe. Some people take valerian for headaches, depression, cardiac arrhythmia and tremors. Valerian is usually for short periods (eg. B. 2-6 weeks) were used in a dosage of 400 to 600 mg of the dried root of 1-times daily at bedtime. Documents In a meta-analysis in 2006 of 16 randomized, placebo-controlled trials of valerian, saying the evidence that valerian might improve sleep quality and reduce the time needed to fall asleep without producing adverse effects ( 1). There is still insufficient clinical data, however, to confirm whether valerian is effective against insomnia. (2-3) There is not enough scientific evidence to determine whether valerian works for headaches, depression, cardiac arrhythmia and tremors. Side effects studies suggest that it is generally safe to give valerian in the usual doses. By Valerian also the effect of other sedatives (eg. As barbiturates) may be prolonged and driving or other activities that require alertness / attention can be restricted. Drug interactions have suggested valerian both to inhibit the CYP3A4 metabolism and the p-glycoprotein activity, (4), but no studies have shown any drug metabolism interactions in vitro studies. Information on Valerian Bent S, Padula A, D Moore, et al. Valerian for sleep: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Med 119 (12): 1005-1012, 2006. Fernández-San Martín MI, Masa-font R, Palacios-Soler L, et al.Effectiveness of valerian on insomnia: a meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials , Sleep Med11 (6): 505-511, 2010. Taibi D, Landis C, Petry H, et al. A systematic review of valerian as a sleep aid: safe but not effective. Sleep Med Rev 11 (3): 209-223, 2007. Hellum BH, Nilsen OG. In vitro inhibition of CYP3A4 metabolism and P-glycoprotein-mediated transport by trade herbal products. Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol 102 (5): 466-475., 2008

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