Typhoid fever is a systemic disease caused by Salmonella serotype Typhi (S. Typhi – Overview of infections with Salmonella) is caused. Symptoms include high fever, exhaustion, abdominal pain and a pink rash. The diagnosis is made clinically and confirmed by microbiological analysis of the pathogen. The sessions are held with ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin or azithromycin.

Typhoid fever is a systemic disease caused by Salmonella serotype Typhi (S. Typhi – Overview of infections with Salmonella) is caused. Symptoms include high fever, exhaustion, abdominal pain and a pink rash. The diagnosis is made clinically and confirmed by microbiological analysis of the pathogen. The sessions are held with ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin or azithromycin. Epidemiology About 400 500 cases of typhoid fever are registered annually in the US, especially among US travelers returning from endemic areas. Man is the only natural host and the only natural reservoir. Typhoid bacteria are excreted in the feces asymptomatic carrier or with the stool or urine of patients. The infection is transmitted by the ingestion of food or water contaminated with feces. By unhygienic behavior after defecation S. Typhi can get into the communal food or water supplies. In endemic areas where sanitary hygiene is generally inadequate, S. typhi is often transmitted through water than through food. In developed countries, however, the transmission is mainly through foods that are contaminated by clinically healthy shedders in the preparation. Even flies can transmit the pathogens of faeces to food. There is a chance of transmission by direct contact (faecal-oral), for example. B. in children during play and in adults during sexual acts. Rarely, diseases among medical staff that has no adequate safeguards against enteritis when changing soiled bedding. The causative agent passes through the gastrointestinal tract into the body and passes into the bloodstream through lymphatic vessels. In severe cases it can lead to intestinal ulceration, hemorrhage and intestinal perforation. Carrier stage Approximately 3% of untreated patients who are referred to as chronic carriers, harboring the pathogen in their gallbladder and divorced him over> 1 year with the chair. Some shedders there is no anamnestic evidence of clinical disease. Most of the estimated about 2000 shedders in the USA are elderly women with a chronic disease of the bile ducts. Obstructive uropathy due to schistosomiasis or nephrolithiasis may represent a disposition for a urological carrier status for certain typhoid patient. Epidemiological studies indicate that typhoid carriers more likely to develop a malignant tumor of the liver and biliary system. Symptoms and signs The incubation period (usually 8-14 days) is in inverse proportion to the number of total-oriented agents. The disease usually begins gradually with fever, headache, arthralgia, pharyngitis, constipation, anorexia and abdominal pain and abdominal guarding. Less commonly, there is dysuria, nonproductive cough, and epistaxis. Without treatment, the temperature rises about 2-3 days gradually, remains on further 10-14 days increased (usually 39.4 to 40 ° C), then starts at the end of the third week is gradually falling and reached during the fourth week returned to normal Values. A Prolonged fever is often accompanied by a relative bradycardia and prostration. In severe cases can cause central nervous symptoms such. come as delirium, stupor or coma. In approximately 10-20% of patients clusters of pale pink color, pale lesions (rose spots) on the thorax and abdomen, which resolve in 2-5 days appear again during the second week. There is often splenomegaly, leukopenia, anemia, abnormal liver function, proteinuria and a slight coagulation. Even an acute cholecystitis and hepatitis may occur. Typhoid fever (roseola) Image courtesy of Charles N. Farmer, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, on Public Health Image Library of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/typhoid_rose_spots_high_arrows_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/typhoid_rose_spots_high_arrows_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ Typhoid fever (roseola) ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v37895916 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eBei about 10-20% of patients with typhoid appear during the second week of the infection roseolse (discrete

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