Traumatic Eardrum

Traumatic eardrum may be accompanied by pain, bleeding, hearing loss, tinnitus and vertigo. The diagnosis is made otoscope. Often, no treatment is necessary. Infections can make antibiotics required. If perforations are made more than 2 months, the ossicular chain is interrupted or coexist inner ear injury, they must be surgically.

Among the causes of traumatic eardrum include:

Traumatic eardrum may be accompanied by pain, bleeding, hearing loss, tinnitus and vertigo. The diagnosis is made otoscope. Often, no treatment is necessary. Infections can make antibiotics required. If perforations are made more than 2 months, the ossicular chain is interrupted or coexist inner ear injury, they must be surgically. Among the causes of traumatic eardrum include: intentional and unintentional insertion of objects into the ear canal (eg cotton swab.) Shock of an explosion or slap head trauma (at the ear) ((with / without Schädelbasisbruch) sudden vacuum eg by. suction / strong suction of the ear canal) barotrauma (z. B. in air travel or in a diving) iatrogenic induced perforation, such as a ear irrigation or foreign body removal Penetrating eardrum injury can, to a displacement of the ossicular chain or wedging of individual fragments to cancel the stapes footplate to bleeding (infiltrates in the round or oval window of the perilymph into the middle ear) to a perilymph fistula, or cause injuries to the facial nerve. Symptoms and complaints When a traumatic eardrum suddenly occur severe pain and sometimes even follows bleeding from the ear, hearing loss or tinnitus. If the ossicular torn or the inner ear was injured, the hearing loss may be even stronger. Vertigo indicates an inner ear injury. Within 24-48 hours a purulent otorrhoea can develop, especially by the penetration into the inner ear water. Diagnostic otoscopy audiometry A perforation is clearly visible in the Otoscopy in general. If blood obstructs the view in the ear canal, it is carefully aspirated. An ear irrigation or pneumatic otoscopy should be avoided. Tiny cracks eardrum can possibly only through a microscope examination or impedance test clearly diagnose. In order not to confuse one with injury-Treatment-related hearing loss, an audiometric examination should take place as far as possible before and after treatment. Traumatic eardrum figure provided by Piet van Hasselt, M.D. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/perforation_tympanic_membrane_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/perforation_tympanic_membrane_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ Traumatic eardrum ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v37893977 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eIn this picture can be seen a large traumatic perforation u003c / p u003e u003c / div u003e. ‘credits’ figure provided by Piet van Hasselt

Health Life Media Team

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