(Grain disease, conjunctivitis trachomatosa)

Trachoma is a chronic conjunctivitis caused by Chlamydia trachomatis and is characterized by progressive exacerbations and remissions. It is the leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide. Conjunctival hyperemia, eyelid edema, photophobia and epiphora are the early symptoms. Later there will be a neovascularization of the cornea and scarring of the conjunctiva, cornea and eyelids. The diagnosis is made clinically in general. Treatment includes topical or systemic antibiotics.

In the poverty-stricken parts of North Africa, the Middle East, the Indian subcontinent, Australia and Southeast Asia trachoma is endemic. The trigger is Chlamydia trachomatis (serotypes A, B, Ba and C). In the US, trachoma is rare but occurs occasionally among Native Americans and immigrants. The disease occurs mainly in children, especially between the ages of 3 to 6 years on. Older children and adults are much less likely due to increased immunity and better personal hygiene. In the early stage trachoma is highly contagious and the infection (by eye-eye or eye-hand contact, by flies that enter the eye, or by shared contaminated objects such. As towels, handkerchiefs, eye make -up) transmitted.

Trachoma is a chronic conjunctivitis caused by Chlamydia trachomatis and is characterized by progressive exacerbations and remissions. It is the leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide. Conjunctival hyperemia, eyelid edema, photophobia and epiphora are the early symptoms. Later there will be a neovascularization of the cornea and scarring of the conjunctiva, cornea and eyelids. The diagnosis is made clinically in general. Treatment includes topical or systemic antibiotics. In the poverty-stricken parts of North Africa, the Middle East, the Indian subcontinent, Australia and Southeast Asia trachoma is endemic. The trigger is Chlamydia trachomatis (serotypes A, B, Ba and C). In the US, trachoma is rare but occurs occasionally among Native Americans and immigrants. The disease occurs mainly in children, especially between the ages of 3 to 6 years on. Older children and adults are much less likely due to increased immunity and better personal hygiene. In the early stage trachoma is highly contagious and the infection (by eye-eye or eye-hand contact, by flies that enter the eye, or by shared contaminated objects such. As towels, handkerchiefs, eye make -up) transmitted. Symptoms and complaints Trachoma affects both eyes normally. It describes four stages. In stage 1, after an incubation period of about 7 days, usually develop gradually bilateral conjunctival hyperemia, eyelid edema, photophobia and epiphora. In stage 2, after 7-10 days, developing on the upper tarsal small follicles, whose size and number over 3 or 4 weeks gradually increases. Inflammatory papillae appear on the upper tarsal conjunctiva. Neovascularization of the cornea begins and there is an invasion of the upper half of the cornea by vascular loops from the limbus, a finding which is called a pannus. The phase of acute follicular and papillary hypertrophy and corneal neovascularization may take several months to> 1 year, depending on the response to treatment. In Stage 3, the follicles and papillae gradually shrink and be replaced by Narbengewebsstränge. Without treatment, ultimately corneal scarring occur. At the end of the whole cornea may be affected and the vision to be reduced. A secondary bacterial infection is common and contributes to scarring and disease progression. In stage 4, the conjunctival scar tissue often causes entropion (often with trichiasis) and obstruction of the lacrimal duct. Entropion trichiasis and lead to further scarring and neovascularization of the cornea. The corneal epithelium is dull and thick, the tear fluid decreases. In the area of ??peripheral corneal infiltrates small corneal ulcers may occur and stimulate further neovascularization. In rare cases, corneal neovascularization is without treatment all the way back and the cornea transparency returns. After treatment and healing of the cornea is smooth and gray white. Impaired vision or blindness occurs in about 5% of people with trachoma. Trachoma in stage 2 Image courtesy of the World Health Organization about the Online Journal of Ophthalmology (www.onjoph.com). var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/stage_2_trachoma_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/stage_2_trachoma_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ trachoma in stage 2 ‘, description:’ u003Ca id = “v37894198 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eIm stage 2 of a trachoma

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