Superficial vein thrombosis is a blood clot in a superficial vein of the upper or lower extremity or, less frequently, in one or more veins of the thorax or chest (Mondor’s disease).

Superficial vein thrombosis in the upper extremity is most commonly caused by an infusion or an intravenous catheter; varicose veins appear to be the main risk to the lower limbs, especially in women. Superficial venous thrombosis rarely cause serious complications and even embolize rare.

Superficial vein thrombosis is a blood clot in a superficial vein of the upper or lower extremity or, less frequently, in one or more veins of the thorax or chest (Mondor’s disease). Superficial vein thrombosis in the upper extremity is most commonly caused by an infusion or an intravenous catheter; varicose veins appear to be the main risk to the lower limbs, especially in women. Superficial venous thrombosis rarely cause serious complications and even embolize rare. Typically, patients present with pain, tenderness, or a hardened strand at a palpable superficial vein. The overlying skin is usually warm and erythematous. A migratory superficial thrombosis that develops in normal arm, leg and trunk veins at different times, disappears and reappears, is a possible sign of pancreatic cancer and other adenocarcinomas (Trousseau’s syndrome). Diagnosis is based on history and physical examination. Patients with superficial vein thrombosis above the knee are at increased risk of deep venous thrombosis and should probably be subjected to ultrasound. The treatment traditionally includes warm compresses and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. In patients with large phlebitis anticoagulation (z. B. with heparin, low molecular weight, fondaparinux) is often helpful. The optimal therapy and duration are unknown, but most experts recommend using either low molecular weight heparin (z. B. with enoxaparin 40 mg once / day or fondaparinux 2.5 mg once / day) and a treatment period of about a month.

Health Life Media Team

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