Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome

The Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) is an acute epidermolysis by a staphylococcal toxin. Newborns and children are most often affected. Symptoms include extensive bullae with peeling of the epidermis. The diagnosis is made by clinical examination and sometimes biopsy. The sessions are held with staphylococcal effective antibiotics and local skin care. With early treatment, the prognosis is excellent.

SSSS affects almost exclusively children <6 years (v. A. Infants). In the elderly, it rarely occurs unless a kidney failure or an immune deficiency exists. In nurseries epidemics are possible, probably by transmission via the hands of staff who had or with an infected infant contact whose nose is colonized with Staphylococcus aureus. Sporadic cases may also occur.

The Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) is an acute epidermolysis by a staphylococcal toxin. Newborns and children are most often affected. Symptoms include extensive bullae with peeling of the epidermis. The diagnosis is made by clinical examination and sometimes biopsy. The sessions are held with staphylococcal effective antibiotics and local skin care. With early treatment, the prognosis is excellent. SSSS affects almost exclusively children <6 years (v. A. Infants). In the elderly, it rarely occurs unless a kidney failure or an immune deficiency exists. In nurseries epidemics are possible, probably by transmission via the hands of staff who had or with an infected infant contact whose nose is colonized with Staphylococcus aureus. Sporadic cases may also occur. The SSSS is caused by coagulase Group II staphylococci, usually phage type 71 that release a exfoliatin (or Epidermolysin). This toxin cleaves the upper part of the epidermis directly below the stratum granulosum from (staph infections). Primary infection is often typically develops during the first few days on the umbilical stump or in the diaper area, in older children in the face. The toxin produced in these areas enters the bloodstream and exerts its effect on the entire skin. Symptoms and complaints The primary lesion is usually superficial and crusted. Within 24 hours, the surrounding skin is painful and turns dark red. These changes spread quickly to other areas. Often the skin is very painful to touch, with a consistency like wrinkled parchment paper. On the erythematous skin large flat bubbles burst quickly, leaving erosions form. Bubbles often occur in friction areas, such intertriginous areas, buttocks, hands and feet. Intact bubbles expand while pushing sideways out (Nikolsky sign). The epidermis peels off easily and often over a large area. Within 36 to 72 hours it comes to extensive desquamation and patients become severely ill with systemic symptoms (eg. As malaise, chills, fever). The desquamated regions act scalded. Due to the loss of the protective skin barrier often leads to sepsis as well as fluid and electrolyte disturbances. Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome figure provided by Thomas Habif, M.D. var model = {thumbnailUrl: '/-/media/manual/professional/images/staphylococcal_scalded_skin_a_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350' imageUrl: '/-/media/manual/professional/images/staphylococcal_scalded_skin_a_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ', title:' staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome ', description:' u003Ca id = "v37894493 " class = ""anchor "" u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = ""para "" u003e u003cp u003eDas staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome is a epidermolysis by a staphylococcal toxin. There are almost always children u003cspan class = ""symbol "" u003e u003c u003c / span u003e 6 years affected u003c / p u003e u003c / div u003e 'credits'. Figure provided by Thomas Habif

Health Life Media Team

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