Sprained Wrist, Diagnosis, Symptoms, Treatments

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A wrist sprain is a prevalent injury for many athletes. A sprain can happen quickly, a momentary loss of balance, or a slip in which you trip to break your fall by sticking your head out to catch yourself. However, once your hand hits the ground, the force of the impact bends it back toward your forearm. This can spread the ligaments that connect the wrist and hand bones too far. This will result in tiny tears along the ligament; worst case, the ligament could break completely.


  • Being hit in wrist
  • Exciting Extreme pressure on wires or twisting it,

Wrist Sprains are common in:

  • Divers
  • Gymnast
  • Basketball players
  • Skiers, especially when they fall while holding a pole
  • Skateboarders
  • Skaters
  • Inline Skaters
  • Football players.
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What does A Wrist Sprain Feel Like?
Symptoms of a wrist sprain are:

  • Swelling
  • Tenderness and warmth around the injury
  • Feeling a popping or tearing in the first
  • Bruising
  • Pain

To diagnose a primary sprain, your doctor will give you a through a through a physical exam. You might also need an:

  • MRI (Magnetic resonance imaging)
  • X-Ray
  • Arthrogram, special type of X-rays or MRI done after a dye is injected into the wrist
  • Arthroscopy, A minimally invasive energy in which a tiny camera is inserted into the first.

Sprains are usually divided into three grades:

  • Grade I, pain with lesser injury to the ligament
  • Grade II: Pain, more critical ligament damage, a sensation of looseness to the joint and some impairment of function
  • Grade III: Pain, a fully torn ligament, severe looseness of the joint and, a loss of function.
Wrist Sprain. Palm/ Anterior view. Palmar metacarpal ligament, Hook of hamate bone, Pisiform bone, Ulnar radiocarpal ligament, Styloid process of ulna, Ulna, First metacarpal, Capitate bone, Carpometacarpal joint, Radiate carpal ligament, Palmar radiocarpal ligament, Lunate bone, Styloid process of radius, Radius. MendMeShop TM ©2011.
Wrist Sprain. Palm/ Anterior view. Palmar metacarpal ligament, Hook of hamate bone, Pisiform bone, Ulnar radiocarpal ligament, Styloid process of ulna, Ulna, First metacarpal, Capitate bone, Carpometacarpal joint, Radiate carpal ligament, Palmar radiocarpal ligament, Lunate bone, Styloid process of radius, Radius. MendMeShop TM ©2011.

What’s the treatment for a Wrist Sprain?

  • While they can bench for a while, the good news is that minor -to moderate wrist sprains should heal independently. They just need a little time. To speed the healing, you can.
  • Ice your wrist to decrease pain and swelling. Do it 20-30 minutes every three to four hours or two o three days or until the pain is gone.
  • Relax your wrist for at least 48 hours.
  • Compress the wrist with a bandage.
  • Raise your wrist above your heart, on a pillow, or the back of a chair as often as you can.
  • Take anti-inflammatory medical painkillers. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), like Advil, Mortin, or Aleve, will help with pain and swelling. Nevertheless, these drugs can have side effects, like a higher risk of bleeding and ulcers. They should be used only seldom unless your doctor especially says otherwise.
  • Using a Splint or Cast – To keep first immobile. This should be for a short time until you see the doctor. They follow the doctor’s advice about whether or not to continue using a splint. Using support for too long can result in more stiffness and muscle weakness in some cases.
  • Practice stretching and strengthening exercises if your doctor recommends them.
  • Practice stretching and stringing exercises if your doctor recommends them.
  • More severe Grade III -wrist sprains, in which the ligament is clasped, may require surgery to repair.

When Will I improve After a Wrist Sprain?

Recovery time depends on how severe your wrist sprain is. These injuries may take from two to 10 weeks to heal. However, that is a rough estimate. Everyone recovers at a different rate.

 While you recover, you might desire to carry on a new activity that won’t aggravate your wrist. For example, skiers could put down their poles and try jogging or stationary biking.

 Whatever you do, don’t hurry things, Do not rush to return to your old level or physical activity.

 You feel no pain at your worst when it is at rest.

 You can work out and grip and move objects –simpler to bat, racket, ski pole, without pain.

 Your wounded wrist and the hand and arm on that side feel as strong as the uninjured wrist, hand, and arms.

 If you start using your wrist before it is the head, you could cause permanent damage.

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How Can I Prevent a Wrist Sprain?

 Wrist Sprains are hard to avoid since accidents usually cause them; even the Best -trained athlete can slip. However, always make an effort to excise safety.

 Some athletes benefit from using wrist guards or tape. These may prevent the worst from being backward during a fall.