Various lesions can compress the spinal cord, causing segmental sensitive, motor, reflex deficits and Sphinkterstörungen. The diagnosis is made by an MRI. The treatment is to relieve the compression.

(See also overview of diseases of the spinal cord and Immediate supply in spinal trauma.)

Various lesions can compress the spinal cord, causing segmental sensitive, motor, reflex deficits and Sphinkterstörungen. The diagnosis is made by an MRI. The treatment is to relieve the compression. (See also overview of diseases of the spinal cord and Immediate supply in spinal trauma.) Compression is more often caused by a lesion outside of the spinal cord (extramedullary) than lesions within the spinal cord (intramedullary). The compression can be acute therapy subacute Chronic Acute compression develops within minutes to hours. It is often caused by trauma (eg. As comminuted fractures of vertebrae with dislocation of the fractured bone parts, acute herniated disc, metastatic tumors, severe bony or ligamentous injuries hematoma or a vertebral subluxation or dislocation cause). It is sometimes caused by an abscess and rarely a spontaneous epidural hematoma. An acute compression may be superimposed on a subacute or chronic compression, v. a. if the cause is an abscess or tumor. Subacute compression develops over days to weeks. It is usually caused by metastatic tumor extramedullary, a subdural or epidural abscess or a hematoma or through a cervical or, less commonly, a thoracic herniated disc. A chronic compression develops over months to years. It is i. Gen. by bony protrusions in the cervical, thoracic or lumbar spinal canal (z. B. caused by osteophytes or spondylosis, in particular with narrow the spinal canal, as in the lumbar spinal stenosis. The compression can be enhanced by a herniated disc and hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum. Less common causes include arteriovenous malformations and slow-growing extramedullary tumors. a atlantoaxial subluxation and other craniocervical junction abnormalities can cause an acute, subacute or chronic spinal cord compression. lesions that compress the spinal cord can also compress nerve roots or, rarely, interrupt the spinal blood supply and cause a spinal cord infarction. symptoms and complaints An acute or advanced spinal cord compression results in segmental failure, paraplegia or quadriplegia , Hyporeflexia (acute) followed by hyperreflexia, pyramidal tract signs, loss of sphincter tone (with rectal and bladder dysfunction) and sensory deficits. A subacute or chronic compression can begin with local back pain, often radiate (radicular pain) in the innervation of a nerve root, and sometimes with hyperreflexia and sensory deficits. The sensory deficits can begin in the sacral segments. A complete loss of function may be followed by a sudden and unpredictable, possibly as a result of a secondary Rückenmarksinfarzierung. A significant knock sensitivity of the spine occurs when the cause is a metastatic carcinoma, an abscess or hematoma. Intramedullary lesions likely cause damage difficult to localized burning pain as a radicular pain sensitivity in the sacral dermatomes remains more likely to receive. The lesions usually lead to spastic paresis. Diagnosis MRI or CT myelography Spinal cord compression is to be considered in spinal or radicular pain with reflex, motor or sensory deficits, especially on a segment level. Tips and risks Immediate imaging of the spinal cord is to be performed when patients have spinal or radicular pain with reflex, motor or sensory deficits, especially on a segment level. It is performed immediately an MRI when available. If no MRI is available, a CT myelography is performed; a small amount of iohexol (a non-ionic, niedrigosmolares contrast agent) is injected via a lumbar puncture and can then pass through appropriate positioning of the patient in the cranial direction, to determine a complete Liquorstopp. Is a Liquorstopp before, a radioactive dye is injected via a cervical puncture of the spinal canal in order to determine the extent of the rostral Liquorstopps. In V. a. traumatic bone abnormalities (eg. as fracture, dislocation, subluxation), requiring immediate immobilization of the spine, a simple spinal X-ray examination can be performed. However, be better detected with CT bone abnormalities. Compressive myelopathy Courtesy of John Tsiouris, M.D., Division of Neuroradiology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital / Weill Cornell Medical Center. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/spinal_cord_compression_slide_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/spinal_cord_compression_slide_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ The compressive myelopathy ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v37896662 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eDas sagittal T2-weighted MRI shows a compression of the spinal cord in the lumbar disc levels C4-5

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