Sjogren’S Syndrome (Ss)

(Sjogren’s Syndrome)

Sjogren’s syndrome (SS) is a relatively common, chronic, autoimmune, systemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. It is characterized by sicca symptoms in the mouth, eyes and other mucous membranes due to lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine gland and secondarily due to a dysfunction of the gland. The SS can affect various exocrine glands or other organs. The diagnosis is made by means of specific criteria (occasionally) include the involvement of eyes, mouth and salivary glands, specific autoantibodies and histopathology. The treatment is usually symptomatic.

The SS occurs most often in middle-aged women. It is classified as primary if no other associated disease exists. Approximately 30% of patients with autoimmune diseases such as RA, SLE, systemic sclerosis, MCTD, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, primary biliary cirrhosis or chronic autoimmune hepatitis develop an SS, and in these cases, the disease is classified as secondary. There are genetic associations found (z. B. HLA-DR3 in Caucasians with primary SS).

Sjogren’s syndrome (SS) is a relatively common, chronic, autoimmune, systemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. It is characterized by sicca symptoms in the mouth, eyes and other mucous membranes due to lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine gland and secondarily due to a dysfunction of the gland. The SS can affect various exocrine glands or other organs. The diagnosis is made by means of specific criteria (occasionally) include the involvement of eyes, mouth and salivary glands, specific autoantibodies and histopathology. The treatment is usually symptomatic. The SS occurs most often in middle-aged women. It is classified as primary if no other associated disease exists. Approximately 30% of patients with autoimmune diseases such as RA, SLE, systemic sclerosis, MCTD, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, primary biliary cirrhosis or chronic autoimmune hepatitis develop an SS, and in these cases, the disease is classified as secondary. There are genetic associations found (z. B. HLA-DR3 in Caucasians with primary SS). Pathophysiology salivary, lacrimal and other exocrine glandular be infiltrated by CD4 + T cells and to a lesser extent of B-cells. The T cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as interleukin-2, interferon-?). The cells of the salivary duct also produce cytokines, thereby finally the secretory Ausführgänge be destroyed. Atrophy of secretory epithelium of the lacrimal gland causes a drying of the cornea and conjunctiva (keratoconjunctivitis sicca, keratoconjunctivitis sicca). Lymphocytic infiltrate and cell proliferation in the corridors of the parotid gland cause a narrowing of the lumen, in some cases, form compact cell structures, so-called. Myoepithelial islands, atrophy of the gland is often the result. The dryness and atrophy of the mucosa and submucosa and diffuse lymphocytic infiltrates can cause dysphagia as in Gastrointestinalrakt symptoms. Symptoms and complaints Glandular manifestations The SS concerns initially (and sometimes the only manifestation) are often the eyes and mouth. Dry eyes can cause a sandy, gritty foreign body sensation. In advanced cases there is severe damage to the corneal epithelial threads are formed on the surface (keratitis filiformis), vision may be impaired. The reduction in saliva production (xerostomia) leads to difficulty in chewing and swallowing, secondary Candida infection, tooth decay and stone formation in the saliva passes. Taste and smell may be impaired. The drought may also affect the skin and mucous membranes in the nose, throat, larynx, bronchi, vulva and vagina. The dryness in the respiratory tract often leads to a dry cough. Also alopecia is possible. In approximately 33% of patients it comes to Parotisvergrößerung with firmer, smoother texture and less tenderness. The magnification can be asymmetrical, a particularly disproportionate enlargement of a gland, but may indicate a tumor. Chronic enlargement of the salivary gland is rarely painful, unless there is an obstruction or infection. Sjogren’s syndrome (tongue) JAMES STEVENSON / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/m2600013_dry_tongue_in_sjogren_s_syndrome_science_photo_library_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/ – / media /manual/professional/images/m2600013_dry_tongue_in_sjogren_s_syndrome_science_photo_library_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0 ‘, title:’ Sjögren’s syndrome (tongue) ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v37892773 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eDiese figure shows reduced salivation (xerostomia)

Health Life Media Team

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