Sinusitis

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In a sinusitis or sinus infection may be a viral, bacterial or fungal infection or an allergic reaction. Symptoms may include nasal congestion and -obstruktion, purulent rhinorrhea and facial pain or pressure, sometimes malaise and / or fever occur. The treatment of suspected bacterial infection is the administration of antibiotics such as amoxicillin / clavulanic acid or doxycycline, administered for 5-7 days in acute sinusitis and for up to 6 weeks in chronic sinusitis. Decongestants, corticosteroid nasal sprays and warm, moist compresses can cause alleviation of symptoms and better secretion drainage from the sinus. In recurrent sinusitis to improve the secretion drainage, surgery may be indicated.

Sinusitis can (heals in <30 days completely), subacute (heal in 30-90 days off), relapsing (? 4 acute single episodes per year, which decay respectively in <30 days, but recur cyclically as acute, wherein between the end of the old and the beginning of a new episode at least 10 complaint-free days are) and chronic (> 90 days lasting) are classified.

In a sinusitis or sinus infection may be a viral, bacterial or fungal infection or an allergic reaction. Symptoms may include nasal congestion and -obstruktion, purulent rhinorrhea and facial pain or pressure, sometimes malaise and / or fever occur. The treatment of suspected bacterial infection is the administration of antibiotics such as amoxicillin / clavulanic acid or doxycycline, administered for 5-7 days in acute sinusitis and for up to 6 weeks in chronic sinusitis. Decongestants, corticosteroid nasal sprays and warm, moist compresses can cause alleviation of symptoms and better secretion drainage from the sinus. In recurrent sinusitis to improve the secretion drainage, surgery may be indicated. Sinusitis can (heals in <30 days completely), subacute (heal in 30-90 days off), relapsing (? 4 acute single episodes per year, which decay respectively in <30 days, but recur cyclically as acute, wherein between the end of the old and the beginning of a new episode at least 10 complaint-free days are) and chronic (> 90 days lasting) are classified. Etiology A community-acquired acute sinusitis in immunocompetent patients is almost always viral (eg. As rhinovirus, influenza, parainfluenza). A small percentage developed a secondary bacterial infection with streptococci, pneumococci, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Staphylococcus. Occasionally a periapical tooth abscess is spreading at an upper jaw tooth on the overlying sinus. A hospital-acquired acute infection is more common bacteria; typical pathogens are Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, and Enterobacter. In immunocompromised patients, acute invasive fungal sinusitis can occur (INVASIVE sinusitis in immunocompromised patients). Chronic sinusitis involves many factors that can lead to chronic inflammation. Chronic allergies, structural abnormalities (eg. As nasal polyps), environmental stimuli (eg., Air pollution, tobacco smoke), mucociliary dysfunction and other factors interact with infectious organisms and cause chronic sinusitis. The pathogens are common bacteria (possibly as part of a biofilm on the mucosal surface), but can also be mycotic. Many bacteria are suitable as pathogens, including gram-negative bacteria and oropharyngeal anaerobic microorganisms; a polymicrobial infection is widespread. In individual cases, from a dental infection a chronic maxillary sinusitis develops. Fungal infections (Aspergillus, Sporothrix, Pseudallescheria) can be chronic and affect mainly the elderly and immunocompromised patients. Allergic sinusitis is a form of chronic sinusitis. Features are diffuse nasal congestion, nasal discharge viscous and often nasal polyps. It is not caused by an invasive and systemic mycosis, but represents an allergic reaction to a local fungal infection (usually with Aspergillus). In Invasive fungal sinusitis is an aggressive, sometimes fatal infections in immunosuppressed patients, usually caused by Aspergillus or Mucor species risk factors to the common risk factors for sinusitis include factors that lead to obstruction of the normal sinus drainage (eg. as allergic rhinitis, nasal polyps, nasogastric or nasotracheal probes) and immunkompromittierende states (eg. as diabetes, HIV infection ). Other factors include extended stays in the ICU, severe burns, cystic fibrosis and ciliary dyskinesia. Pathophysiology When the swollen nasal mucosa postponed the ostium of a paranasal sinus in respiratory tract infections, oxygen from the sinus mucosa of the vessels is absorbed. This creates a relative vacuum in the sinuses, which is very painful (vacuum sinusitis). If the vacuum is maintained, the sinus increasingly filled with transudate from the mucosa; this serves transudate bacteria as a medium to enter (through the ostium directly or as a propagating mucosal inflammation of the lamina propria and thrombophlebitis) in the sinus. With the outflow of serum and leukocytes to fight infection, a painful pressure in the laid sinus developed. The mucosa is hyperemic and edematous. Complications The main complication of sinusitis is the local spread of the bacterial infection, resulting in periorbital or orbital cellulitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis or epidural or brain abscess. Symptoms and signs Acute and chronic sinusitis call like symptoms and clinical signs out, including purulent nasal discharge, feeling of pressure and pain in the face, nasal congestion and mucosal swelling, hyposmia, Foetor and productive cough (especially at night). Often the pain is severe in the case of acute sinusitis. The skin over the affected sinus may be swollen, pressure sensitive and reddened. A maxillary sinusitis leads to jaw, teeth and frontal headaches, sinusitis frontalis to a painful inflammation in the end region and frontal headache. In an ethmoid sinusitis (often “furious” as a frontal headache characterized) are pain behind and between the eyes with a periorbital inflammation and watery eyes connected. A sphenoid sinusitis caused less well localized pain that is often projected in the front or back of the head. Sinusitus LIVING ART ENTERPRISES, LLC / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/m2600382-sinusitis-science-photo-library-high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ , imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/m2600382-sinusitis-science-photo-library-high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0’, title: ‘sinusitus’ description:’ u003Ca id = “v37893983 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eKontrastierung of the right (on the left from the observer) the ethmoid

Health Life Media Team

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