The selective antibody deficiency with normal immunoglobulins, is characterized by the lack of specific antibody response to polysaccharide antigens, but not on protein antigens, although the serum levels of immunoglobulins, including IgG subclasses, normal or nearly normal are.

(See also Overview of immune deficiency disorders, and approach to the patient with an immunodeficiency disorder).

The selective antibody deficiency with normal immunoglobulins, is characterized by the lack of specific antibody response to polysaccharide antigens, but not on protein antigens, although the serum levels of immunoglobulins, including IgG subclasses, normal or nearly normal are. (See also Overview of immune deficiency disorders, and approach to the patient with an immunodeficiency disorder). The selective antibody deficiency with normal immunoglobulins (sadni) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder. He is one of the most common immune deficiency disorder that manifests with recurrent sino-pulmonary infections. Selective antibody defects can occur in other disorders, but sadni represents a primary disorder is where the incorrect response to polysaccharide antigens is the only abnormality (see Table: Overview of immunodeficiency diseases: humoral immunodeficiency disorders). Inheritance and pathophysiology are not yet clear, but some evidence suggests that the cause could be hereditary molecular abnormalities. A subset of patients with sadni initially have an adequate response to the polysaccharide antigen, but lose antibody titers within 6-8 months (hereinafter sadni memory phenotype). Patients have recurrent infections and sometimes sinopulmonary manifestations suggestive of atopy (eg. As chronic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, asthma). The severity of the disease varies. Infants may have a form of sadni that spontaneously disappears over time. Diagnosis immunoglobulin levels (IgG, IgA, IgM and IgG subclasses) responses to polysaccharide vaccines Because healthy children 2 years. Then, the levels of IgG, IgA, IgM and IgG subclasses, and the reactions are measured in vaccines. The only abnormality in laboratory tests is an inadequate response to polysaccharide vaccines (eg. As pneumococcal vaccination). The answers to protein vaccines are normal. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine therapy-prophylactic Sometimes Antibiotka and sometimes immunoglobulin replacement therapy Patients should with the Pneumococcal conjugate-vaccine (z. B. 13-valent) be vaccinated. Sinopulmonary infections and atopic manifestations be treated aggressively. In unusual cases, if the infections continue to recur, prophylactic antibiotics (eg. As amoxicillin, trimethoprim / sulfamethoxazole) may be administered. In rare cases, if the infections often recur despite prophylactic antibiotics, an immunoglobulin replacement therapy may be administered.

Health Life Media Team

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