Seizures due to respiratory arrests have episodes where the child involuntarily stops shortly after a frightening or emotionally exciting event or after a painful experience to breathe and is unconscious.

Schrecksynkopen by respiratory arrest occur in about 5% of healthy children. They usually begin in the first year of life and have their peak incidence at the age of 2 years. They disappear at the age of 4 years at 50% and at the age of 8 years in 83% of children. The remaining patients have these attacks until adulthood. Schrecksynkopen by respiratory arrest appears to be no risk factors for true epilepsy, but can be associated with an increased risk of fainting in adulthood. There are two types of Schrecksynkopen by breath-holding:

Seizures due to respiratory arrests have episodes where the child involuntarily stops shortly after a frightening or emotionally exciting event or after a painful experience to breathe and is unconscious. Schrecksynkopen by respiratory arrest occur in about 5% of healthy children. They usually begin in the first year of life and have their peak incidence at the age of 2 years. They disappear at the age of 4 years at 50% and at the age of 8 years in 83% of children. The remaining patients have these attacks until adulthood. Schrecksynkopen by respiratory arrest appears to be no risk factors for true epilepsy, but can be associated with an increased risk of fainting in adulthood. There are two types of Schrecksynkopen by breath-holding: cyanotic Form: This form is most common, often comes as part of a tantrum or in response to insults or other out of the socket-making events before. Pale form: the pale form typically follows a painful experience like a fall, in which the child strikes the head, but can also by frightening or-making out of the socket events occur. Both forms are involuntary and can be distinguished from the unusually short episode voluntarily hold their breath in defiant children. These children breathe normally again after they got what they wanted, or after they feel uncomfortable when they do not achieve what they want. During the cyanotic episode, the child holds his breath without realizing that it does, until it loses consciousness. Typically, the child cries, breathes out and stops breathing. Shortly after the child turns blue and the unconsciousness follows. A brief seizure may occur. After a few seconds, the breathing stops again, it resumes color and consciousness returns. Sometimes it is possible to interrupt the Schrecksynkope if you put a wet cloth over the child’s face. Despite the daunting nature of Schrecksynkopen parents must avoid triggering reinforce behavior. If the child has recovered, parents should continue to meet its normal rules. distract the child and avoid situations that lead to tantrums, are good strategies. The cyanotic form of talks, according to studies on a iron therapy, even without anemia is present. The treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (if any) will be helpful. During a seizure the pale form of vagal stimulation significantly slows the heartbeat. The child stops breathing, quickly loses consciousness and is pale and limp. If the seizure lasts longer than a few seconds, the muscle tone and seizures and incontinence can occur strengthened. After the attack, the heartbeat is faster again, which starts breathing and consciousness returns without treatment. Since this form is rare, further investigations should be carried out. If the seizures occur frequently, a treatment may be necessary. A simultaneous examination with ECG and EEG can help to distinguish cardiac and neurological causes.

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