The Retinal detachment is a separation of the neurosensory retina from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium. The most common cause is a retinal tear (rhegmatogenous detachment). Symptoms include a reduced peripheral or central vision, which is often described as a curtain or dark cloud in front of the field. The accompanying symptoms include painless visual disturbances such as flashes of light and increased suspended particles. Tractional and serous retinal detachment cause (without retinal tears) the central or peripheral vision loss. Diagnosis is made by fundoscopy; Ultrasound can help determine the presence and type of retinal detachment, if this is not seen with ophthalmoscopy. Immediate treatment is essential if the rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is acute and threaten the central vision. Treatment of a rhegmatogenous detachment may include the sealing of retinal holes (laser or cryotherapy), support of the holes through denting of the sclera, pneumatic retinopexy and / or vitrectomy.

The Retinal detachment is a separation of the neurosensory retina from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium. The most common cause is a retinal tear (rhegmatogenous detachment). Symptoms include a reduced peripheral or central vision, which is often described as a curtain or dark cloud in front of the field. The accompanying symptoms include painless visual disturbances such as flashes of light and increased suspended particles. Tractional and serous retinal detachment cause (without retinal tears) the central or peripheral vision loss. Diagnosis is made by fundoscopy; Ultrasound can help determine the presence and type of retinal detachment, if this is not seen with ophthalmoscopy. Immediate treatment is essential if the rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is acute and threaten the central vision. Treatment of a rhegmatogenous detachment may include the sealing of retinal holes (laser or cryotherapy), support of the holes through denting of the sclera, pneumatic retinopexy and / or vitrectomy. Etiology There are 3 types of detachment: rhegmatogenous (including a retinal tear included), tractional and serous (exudative) detachment. Tractional and serous retinal detachments do not include a plan and are referred to as non-rhegmatogenous. Rhegmatogenous detachment is the most common. Risk factors include myopia Previous cataract surgery eye injuries Lattice Netzhautdgenerationen tractional retinal detachment can be caused by vitreo-retinal traction due präretinaler fibrous membranes, as can occur in proliferative diabetic or sickle cell retinopathy. Serous detachment is caused by exudation of liquid into the subretinal space. Causes include severe uveitis, especially in the Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, choroidal hemangiomas, and primary or metastatic choroidal cancers (cancers that affect the retina). Symptoms and complaints The retinal detachment is painless. To early symptoms of rhegmatogenous detachment include dark or irregular vitreous floaters (particularly a sudden increase), flashes of light (photopsias) and blurred vision. If the detachment progresses, the patient notices often a curtain, veil or turbidity in the field. If the macula is affected, the central vision is reduced. Patients may have a vitreous hemorrhage simultaneously. Tractional and serous (exudative) retinal detachment can cause vision problems, however, may experience no symptoms in the early stages on. Retinal detachment AUL PARKER / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/m1550478-retinal-detachment-science-photo-library-high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/m1550478-retinal-detachment-science-photo-library-high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0’, title: ‘retinal detachment’, description: ‘ u003Ca id = “v37894315 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eDer area of ??detachment of the retina is seen in the middle. Symptoms include blurred vision

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