A newborn is considered to be transmitted when it is born after 42 weeks.

The reason for transmission is unknown in most cases, but a previous transfer increases the risk by 2 to 3 times. Transmission, by anomalies concerning the fetal pituitary-adrenal axis and the X-linked ichthyosis (ichthyosis Hereditary ichthyosis) (such as anencephaly, Nebennierenhypoplasie, congenital adrenal hyperplasia.), Which is associated with a placental sulfatase deficiency, caused.

A newborn is considered to be transmitted when it is born after 42 weeks. The reason for transmission is unknown in most cases, but a previous transfer increases the risk by 2 to 3 times. Transmission, by anomalies concerning the fetal pituitary-adrenal axis and the X-linked ichthyosis (ichthyosis Hereditary ichthyosis) (such as anencephaly, Nebennierenhypoplasie, congenital adrenal hyperplasia.), Which is associated with a placental sulfatase deficiency, caused. Pathophysiology In most cases, results in persistent fetal growth between the 39th and 43rd week of pregnancy to a makrosomischen infant. Sometimes, however, the placenta forms back. As a result, there will be multiple infarcts and the degeneration of the villi, which ultimately placental insufficiency occurs. As a consequence, the fetus will not be sufficiently supplied by the mother of nutrients and O2, which results in a thin (due to the reduction of the soft tissue), malnourished infant with depleted glycogen stores, which is small for gestational age (SGA -Children). After regulation time, the amount of amniotic fluid finally decreases (Oligohydramnios, oligohydramnios). Complications Transmitted infants have a higher morbidity and mortality than term infants. During delivery transmitted infants tend to develop asphyxia meconium aspiration syndrome (meconium aspiration syndrome) hypoglycemia (neonatal hypoglycemia) asphyxia may result from a secondary to Oligohydramnion umbilical cord compression. The meconium aspiration syndrome may be unusually difficult because the amount of amniotic fluid is reduced and thus the aspirated meconium is less diluted. Neonatal hypoglycemia is caused by inadequate glycogen stores at birth. In a perinatal asphyxia, hypoglycaemia is particularly pronounced because the remaining glycogen stores are quickly consumed by the anaerobic metabolism. Symptoms and complaints Transmitted infants appear alert and ready, but have a reduced soft tissue and v. a. subcutaneous fat. The skin is then dependent on the limbs limp and is often dry and scaly. The finger and toe nails are long. The nails and the umbilical cord can also be colored by the departing in utero meconium. Diagnosis Clinical Investigation The diagnosis is made by the clinical picture (assessment of gestational age-new Ballard score) and the calculated birth date. Treatment treatment of complications prognosis and treatment depend on the complications. Often the surfactant administration is very helpful. Children with meconium aspiration syndrome can develop chronic respiratory respiratory failure and secondary pulmonary hypertension without treatment.

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