A slight liver dysfunction sometimes occurs after major surgery in the absence of pre-existing liver disease. This dysfunction usually arises from hepatic ischemia or, been little inexplicable, a result of the anesthesia. Patients with known, well-compensated liver disease (eg., Liver cirrhosis with normal liver function) usually tolerate surgery well. However, surgery may increase the severity of some existing liver disease, such. B. can trigger a laparotomy acute liver failure in a patient with viral or alcoholic hepatitis.

See also liver structure and function and assessment of patients with liver disease.) A slight liver dysfunction sometimes occurs after major surgery in the absence of pre-existing liver disease. This dysfunction usually arises from hepatic ischemia or, been little inexplicable, a result of the anesthesia. Patients with known, well-compensated liver disease (eg., Liver cirrhosis with normal liver function) usually tolerate surgery well. However, surgery may increase the severity of some existing liver disease, such. B. can trigger a laparotomy acute liver failure in a patient with viral or alcoholic hepatitis. Postoperative jaundice The diagnosis of postoperative jaundice requires a liver function test. The time of occurrence of the symptoms will also aid in diagnosis. Multifactorial mixed hyperbilirubinemia is the most common cause of postoperative jaundice. It is caused by increased production of bilirubin and decreased hepatic clearance. This disorder often occurs after major surgery or trauma, in which multiple blood transfusions were needed. Hemolysis, sepsis, absorption of hematoma and blood transfusions increase the Bilirubinlast; simultaneously affect hypoxemia, hepatic ischemia and other poorly understood factors, the liver function. This condition is at its worst usually within a few days after surgery. Liver failure is rare and hyperbilirubinemia forms slowly but usually complete back. Using liver laboratory tests the multifactorial mixed hyperbilirubinemia can be distinguished from a hepatitis. In the multifactorial mixed hyperbilirubinemia a severe hyperbilirubinemia with a slight increase of aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase is common. At a hepatitis aminotransferase levels are usually very high. Postoperative Ischemic hepatitis postoperative “Hepatitis” existeth due to inadequate perfusion, not because of inflammation. The cause is a temporary perioperative hypotension or hypoxia. Typically, the aminotransferase levels quickly rise (often> 1000 U / l), while bilirubin is only slightly increased. Ischemic hepatitis is usually most pronounced within a few days after the operation and disappears within a few days. Halothane-related hepatitis can anesthetics which include halothane or related agents derived. They often usually develops within 2 weeks, with previous fever and is sometimes accompanied by a rash and eosinophilia. A real post-operative hepatitis is rare. She used to be mainly a result of the transmission of hepatitis C virus in blood transfusions. Postoperative cholestasis The most common cause of postoperative cholestasis is an obstruction of the extrahepatic bile ducts by intra-abdominalle complications or medications that were given postoperatively. Intrahepatic cholestasis occasionally develops after major surgery, especially after abdominal or cardiovascular surgery (benign postoperative cholestasis). The pathogenesis is unknown, but the physical condition is improving slowly and usually spontaneously. Occasionally, a postoperative cholestasis can occur due to alcoholic cholecystitis or acute pancreatitis.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Sign In

Register

Reset Password

Please enter your username or email address, you will receive a link to create a new password via email.