Portopulmonale hypertension is a pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with portal hypertension without other secondary causes.

Pulmonary hypertension develops in patients with a variety of diseases that involve a portal hypertension with or without cirrhosis with it. A portopulmonale Hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease less frequently than the hepatopulmonale syndrome (3.5 vs. 12%).

Portopulmonale hypertension is a pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with portal hypertension without other secondary causes. Pulmonary hypertension develops in patients with a variety of diseases that involve a portal hypertension with or without cirrhosis with it. A portopulmonale Hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease less frequently than the hepatopulmonale syndrome (3.5 vs. 12%). The main symptoms are dyspnea and fatigue. Chest pain, and hemoptysis may also occur. The patients have the same symptoms and ECG changes consistent with pulmonary hypertension and can sign a pulmonary heart disease develop (reinforced Jugularvenenpuls, edema). Tricuspid regurgitation is frequent. The diagnosis is suspected based on an echocardiographic findings and confirmed by right heart catheterization. The treatment is the same as in pulmonary arterial hypertension, in addition to being hepatotoxic drugs and anticoagulants should be avoided (Pulmonary Hypertension: Treatment). Some patients benefit from treatment with vasodilators. The prognosis is largely determined by the underlying liver disease. Portopulmonale hypertension is a relative contraindication for liver transplants because of increased morbidity and mortality of the procedure. However, pulmonary hypertension versa in some patients who receive a transplant, back, especially those who have a slight pulmonary hypertension. Some centers draw a transplantation in patients with pulmonary arterial pressure <35 mmHg after the test treatment with vasodilators into consideration.

Health Life Media Team

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