Light sensitivity is an over-reaction of the skin to sunlight, where the immune system is involved. They may be idiopathic or occurring after exposure to certain toxic or allergenic drugs or chemicals, and occasionally occurs in the context of systemic diseases to (z. B. SLE, porphyria, Pellagra, xeroderma pigmentosum). The diagnosis is made clinically. Treatment depends on the type of reaction.

(See also Overview of the effects of sunlight.)

Light sensitivity is an over-reaction of the skin to sunlight, where the immune system is involved. They may be idiopathic or occurring after exposure to certain toxic or allergenic drugs or chemicals, and occasionally occurs in the context of systemic diseases to (z. B. SLE, porphyria, Pellagra, xeroderma pigmentosum). The diagnosis is made clinically. Treatment depends on the type of reaction. (See also Overview of the effects of sunlight.) In addition to the acute and chronic effects of sunlight numerous less common reactions immediately after sun exposure occur. If the cause is not obvious, patients should be examined with a strong sensitivity to light facing systemic or cutaneous diseases that are associated with sensitivity to light, such as SLE and porphyria. Urticaria solaris Some patients occurs within a few minutes on the sun-exposed skin urticaria. In rare cases where large areas are affected, syncope, dizziness, wheezing and other systemic symptoms may develop. The etiology is unclear, but could skin’s natural ingredients that act as photoallergens include, leading to other types of urticaria to mast cell degranulation. Urticaria solaris can be distinguished from other types of urticaria in that wheals at urticaria solaris only be setter skin by ultraviolet (UV) light exposure occur. Urticaria solaris can on the component of the UV spectrum (UVA, UVB and visible light) that causes them (and about how to avoid such exposure in sequence or minimized) based, are classified. If necessary, patients may be tested by a part of the skin is exposed to natural light or artificial light of certain wavelengths (Photo Testing). The treatment can be difficult and H1-blockers, anti-malaria drugs, topical corticosteroids, sunscreens, Psoralen plus UVA (PUVA) light and / or narrow-band UVB light comprise. The wheals of urticaria solaris usually last only a few minutes to hours, but the disorder is chronic and can supplied via the years and remove. Chemical Sensitivity More than 100 substances that are taken orally or topically applied, are known to predispose cutaneous reactions after sun exposure. A manageable number is responsible for most reactions (Some substances that cause cutaneous photosensitivity). A distinction is phototoxic and photo-allergic reactions: Photo Testing can help confirm the diagnosis. The chemical photosensitivity is treated with topical glucocorticoids and avoid the triggering agent. In phototoxic reactions light-absorbing components produce free radicals and inflammatory mediators, tissue damage try manifesting as pain and erythema (such as sunburn). no prior exposure to the sun has to be done for this reaction and it can occur in all people, the extent varies greatly. Typical causes of phototoxic reactions include topical (for. Example, perfumes, coal tar, furocoumarin containing plants [such as limes, parsley and celery], drugs for photodynamic therapy) or eingenomme (z. B. Tetracycline, diuretics) agents. Phototoxic reactions do not extend to areas of the skin that were not exposed to sunlight. Photoallergy is a type IV (cell-mediated) immune response. Light absorption causes structural changes in the drug or in the substance, so that they bind to tissue protein and can act as a hapten, whereby the complex is allergenic. For this, a prior exposure to the allergen is required. The reaction is usually eczematous with erythema, scaling, pruritus, and sometimes blisters. Typical causes photoallergic reactions are aftershave, sunscreen and sulfonamides. A photoallergy is less frequent than a phototoxicity and the reaction can be extended to non-exposed skin to sunlight. Some substances that cutaneous photosensitivity cause category specific substance acne medication isotretinoin analgesics NSAIDs (particularly piroxicam, and ketoprofen) antibiotic quinolones sulfonamides tetracyclines trimethoprim antidepressants Tricyclic antidepressants Antifungal griseofulvin Hypoglycemic drugs sulfonylureas malaria drugs chloroquine quinine antipsychotic phenothiazines anxiolytic Alprazolam Chlordiazepoxide Dacarbazine chemotherapy drugs fluorouracil Methotrexate Vinblastine diuretics furosemide thiazide diuretics heart medicines amiodarone quinidine Topical preparations * antibiotics (eg. As chlorhexidine, hexachlorophene) coal tar scents Furocumarin-containing plants (eg. As limes, celery, parsley) sunscreen * There are many topical preparations. The specific substances that are listed, are examples. Polymorphic Light Eruption Polymorphic Light Eruption is a common light-sensitive response to UV and sometimes visible light. They seem to be not associated with systemic disease or with drugs. A positive family history in some patients suggests a genetic risk factor. The dermatoses appear on sun-exposed areas on the, usually 30 minutes to several hours after exposure. Sometimes, however, the dermatoses do not appear up to several days. itchy lesions are erythematous papules and often, but may also be papulovesikul√§r or plaque-like. These reactions are more common in women and people from northern climates when it comes to the first sun exposure in the spring or summer, and less frequently in people with year-round sun exposure. The lesions often disappear within a few days to weeks. The diagnosis is made through medical history, skin findings and the exclusion of other sun sensitivity disorders. Sometimes the diagnosis requires a reproduction of the lesions with photo testing if the patient does not potentially photosensitivity-enhancing drugs. Often the lesions are self eingrenzend and disappear spontaneously as soon as the summer progresses. Precautions include the use of a wide range of sun protection and moderate sun exposure. Patients with more severe cases, often benefit from desensitization at the beginning of spring with gradually increasing UV exposure by low-dose PUVA (psoriasis phototherapy) or narrow-band UVB (312 nm). Mild to moderate eruptions are treated with topical corticosteroids. Patients with obstructive disease can treatment by oral immunosuppressive therapy, such as prednisone, azathioprine, cyclosporine or hydroxychloroquine, need.

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