Periorbitalphlegmone (preseptal phlegmon) is an infection of the eyelids and surrounding skin in front of the orbital septum. Orbital is an infection of the orbital tissue behind the orbital septum. Both can be by an external infection (e.g., as a wound), an infection that spreads from the paranasal sinuses or teeth or caused by an infection dissemination elsewhere. Symptoms include pain eyelid, discoloration and swelling; Orbital cellulitis also causes fever, malaise, exophthalmos, limited eye movement and visual loss. The diagnosis is based on the history, examination, and CT or MRI. is treated with antibiotics and possibly with a surgical drainage.

Periorbitalphlegmone and orbital cellulitis are two different diseases that have some clinical signs and symptoms in common. Periorbitalphlegmone usually begins on the surface before the orbital septum. Orbital cellulitis usually begins in the depth behind the orbital septum. Both are more common in children; Periorbitalphlegmone is far more common than orbital cellulitis.

Periorbitalphlegmone (preseptal phlegmon) is an infection of the eyelids and surrounding skin in front of the orbital septum. Orbital is an infection of the orbital tissue behind the orbital septum. Both can be by an external infection (e.g., as a wound), an infection that spreads from the paranasal sinuses or teeth or caused by an infection dissemination elsewhere. Symptoms include pain eyelid, discoloration and swelling; Orbital cellulitis also causes fever, malaise, exophthalmos, limited eye movement and visual loss. The diagnosis is based on the history, examination, and CT or MRI. is treated with antibiotics and possibly with a surgical drainage. Periorbitalphlegmone and orbital cellulitis are two different diseases that have some clinical signs and symptoms in common. Periorbitalphlegmone usually begins on the surface before the orbital septum. Orbital cellulitis usually begins in the depth behind the orbital septum. Both are more common in children; Periorbitalphlegmone is far more common than orbital cellulitis. The etiology Periorbitalphlegmone usually arises due to spillover of infection from local facial or eyelid injuries, insect or animal bites, conjunctivitis, a chalazion, or sinusitis. The orbital cellulitis is most commonly caused by the spread of an infection of the adjacent sinuses, particularly the ethmoid sinus; more rarely caused by direct infection with a local violation (z. B. insect or animal bite, penetrating eye injury) or by spreading of infection in the area of ??the face or teeth, or by hematogenous spread. The pathogens vary with the etiology and the age of the patient. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common pathogen at a sinusitis, while Staphylococcus aureus and S. pyogenes prevail in infections which are caused by a local injury. Haemophilus influenzae type B was once a common cause, but has become rare because of widespread HIB today. Mushrooms are rare pathogens that can cause orbital cellulitis in diabetic or immunocompromised patients. Infections in children <9 years are typically caused by a single aerobic; with age, especially in an age> 15 years, the infection is usually polymicrobial with aerobic-anaerobic mixed infections (Bacteroides, Peptostreptococcus). Since the pathophysiology orbital cellulitis caused by large neighboring fulminant infectious foci (z. B. sinusitis), which are separated only by a thin bony barrier, the Orbita can infect a large area and heavy. It can subperiosteal fluid collections arise which are sometimes quite large; they are called subperiosteal abscesses, although many are sterile at the beginning. Periorbital and orbital cellulitis Complications include vision loss (3-11%) due to ischemic retinopathy and optic neuropathy due to increased intraorbital pressure; limited eye movement (ophthalmoplegia) due to soft tissue inflammation; and intracranial sequelae by central spread of infection, such as cavernous sinus thrombosis, meningitis and brain abscesses. Symptoms and discomfort symptoms and complaints of Periorbitalphlegmone include tenderness, swelling, warmth, and redness or discoloration (violet in H. influenzae) of the eyelids and sometimes fever. It may be that the patient can not open their eyes because of eyelid swelling. The swelling and discomfort may complicate the investigation of the eye, but when it is done, it shows that the visual acuity is not affected, the eye movement intact, and the eyeball is not emerged (no exophthalmos). Periorbitalphlegmone Image courtesy of James Garrity, M.D. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/preseptal_cellulitis_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/preseptal_cellulitis_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ Periorbitalphlegmone ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v37894282 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003ePräseptale phlegmon (Periorbitalphlegmone) are characterized by swelling

Comments

Leave a Reply

Sign In

Register

Reset Password

Please enter your username or email address, you will receive a link to create a new password via email.