Perioral dermatitis is an erythematous, papulopustulöses Gesichtsexanthem that looks like acne and / or rosacea, but typically begins around the mouth.

Although many triggers of perioral dermatitis have been proposed, such as exposure with topical corticosteroids and / or fluoride in water and toothpaste, but ultimately the etiology is unknown. Despite its name, it is in the perioral dermatitis not a real dermatitis. Affected mostly women of childbearing age and children. The rash typically begins in the nasolabial folds and perioral spreads out, with the area around the cupid bow lips left out. Also possible is a periorbital spread, also involving the forehead.

Perioral dermatitis is an erythematous, papulopustul√∂ses Gesichtsexanthem that looks like acne and / or rosacea, but typically begins around the mouth. Although many triggers of perioral dermatitis have been proposed, such as exposure with topical corticosteroids and / or fluoride in water and toothpaste, but ultimately the etiology is unknown. Despite its name, it is in the perioral dermatitis not a real dermatitis. Affected mostly women of childbearing age and children. The rash typically begins in the nasolabial folds and perioral spreads out, with the area around the cupid bow lips left out. Also possible is a periorbital spread, also involving the forehead. Diagnosis Clinical Investigation The diagnosis is made clinically by the appearance. Perioral dermatitis differs from acne due to the absence of comedones and of rosacea because the latter does not cause lesions around the mouth and eyes. must be excluded also the seborrheic dermatitis and contact dermatitis. The clinically most unindexed biopsy shows spongiosis and a lymphohistiocytic infiltrate the vellus. When lupoid variant granulomas may be present. Perioral dermatitis Image courtesy of Shahbaz Janjua, M.D. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/perioral_dermatitis_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/perioral_dermatitis_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ Perioral dermatitis’ description: ” credits’ image courtesy of Shahbaz Janjua, MD ‘, hideCredits: false, hideTitle: false, hideFigure: false, hideDescription: true}; var panel = $ (MManual.utils.getCurrentScript ()) Closest ( ‘image-element-panel.’). ko.applyBindings (model, panel.get (0)); Therapy avoid fluorinated dental products and topical corticosteroids topical antibiotics or oral tetracycline Treatment involves terminating the use of fluorinated products and dental topical corticosteroids (if used). Instead, for 4 weeks topical antibiotics (eg., 2 times a day Erythromycin 2% or metronidazole 0.75% gel or cream) or oral tetracycline 2 times daily 250-500 mg po used (between meals) and to the lowest effective dose yet tapered off. Alternative oral antibiotics are doxycycline 2 times a day from 50 to 100 mg and minocycline 2 times a day from 50 to 100 mg. Unlike the acne treatment with antibiotics can be stopped in the perioral dermatitis usually. The reason for the effectiveness of antibiotics for perioral dermatitis is unknown because there is no evidence of infection. Topical pimecrolimus (gt for People &; age 2 years) reduces the severity of the disease. For the treatment of granulomatous perioral dermatitis isotretinoin has been used successfully.

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