(Paralysis ds (abducens)

Paralysis of VI. Cranial nerve affects the lateral rectus and thus hinders the Augenabduktion. The eye can be easily adducted when the patient looks straight ahead. The paralysis can be derived from a idiopathic or nerve infarction, a Wernicke encephalopathy, trauma, infection or increased intracranial pressure. The clarification of the cause requires an MRI and often a lumbar puncture and a check for vasculitis.

Paralysis of VI. Cranial nerve affects the lateral rectus and thus hinders the Augenabduktion. The eye can be easily adducted when the patient looks straight ahead. The paralysis can be derived from a idiopathic or nerve infarction, a Wernicke encephalopathy, trauma, infection or increased intracranial pressure. The clarification of the cause requires an MRI and often a lumbar puncture and a check for vasculitis. A paralysis of the etiology VI. Cranial nerves (abducens) is typically caused by a disease of small vessels, v. a. is called in diabetics as part of a disorder mononeuritis multiplex (multiple mononeuropathy). It can be the result of nerve compression by lesions in the cavernous sinus (z. B. nasopharyngeal tumors) of the orbit or skull base. The paralysis can also be caused by elevated intracranial pressure and / or head trauma. Other causes include meningitis, carcinomatous meningitis, Wernicke encephalopathy, aneurysm, vasculitis, multiple sclerosis, pontine stroke and, rarely, headache due to low Liquqordruck (eg after lumbar puncture.). In children with respiratory tract infections, the paralysis may recur. However, it can cause paralysis of an isolated VI. Cranial nerves not often identify. Symptoms and signs The symptoms of paralysis of the VI. Cranial nerves include binocular horizontal double images when looking at the side of the paretic eye is directed. Since the tone of the medial rectus muscle is not counteracted, the eye is slightly adducted when the patient looks straight ahead. The eye abducted depressed, and even if abduction is maximum, the lateral sclera remains exposed. For a complete paralysis of the eye can not be abducted on the midline. Paralysis as a result of nerve compression by bleeding (eg., By head trauma, or intracranial bleeding), a tumor or an aneurysm of the cavernous sinus causes severe headache, chemosis (conjunctival edema), an anesthetic in the innervation of the first branch of the V . cranial nerves, a compression of the optic nerve with vision loss and paralysis of III., IV., and VI. Cranial nerves. In general, both sides are affected, but not to the same degree. Diagnosis MRI In V. a. Vasculitis: determination of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor. Paralysis of VI. Cranial nerve is usually obvious, the cause is not. If venous pulsations in the retina are seen during ophthalmoscopy, increased intracranial pressure is unlikely. CT is often performed because it is often in stock. However, MRI is the investigation of choice; MRI provides higher resolution orbits, cavernous sinus, posterior fossa and cranial nerves. If the results of the imaging are normal, but meningitis or increased intracranial pressure is suspected, a lumbar puncture is performed. With clinically suspected. Vasculitis must begin the investigation with a determination of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor. In children, respiratory infection should be considered if increased intracranial pressure were excluded. Treatment in many patients disappear paralysis of the VI. Cranial nerve when the underlying disorder is treated. The idiopathic and ischemic paralyzes regress usually within 2 months.

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