Paracistic Infections Of The Brain (Neurocysticercosis)

Neurocysticercosis Pork tapeworm larvae produce this infection. Of all the worms that leads to brain infections, the pork tapeworm causes by far the most extensive cases of brain infections within Western Hemisphere. After people eat food tainted with the tapeworm’s eggs, excretions in the stomach induce the eggs to hatch into larvae. The larvae enter the bloodstream and are scattered to all sections of the body, including the brain. The…

Read More >>

Understanding Wound Care

Taking Care of Wounds Wounds of all sizes and severity should always be handled carefully. In this guide, we will discuss these different types of injuries and what to look for during wound care. Care for wounds and lacerations enables the body to heal faster, reduce the risk of infection as well as improve the physiology of area of area. The healing process begins immediately after the injury by coagulation…

Read More >>

Do I have Xeroderma?

(Xerosis) Xeroderma called dry skin that is neither inherited, is still associated with systemic abnormalities. Xeroderma or xerodermia (also known as xerosis cutis, obtained from the Greek words for “dry skin.” Xeroderma is caused by the delayed rejection of the cells of the outermost skin layer, thereby fine white flakes formed. This is a condition involving the integumentary system, which in most cases posterior reliably be treated with moisturizers and…

Read More >>

Xerostomia (Dry Mouth)

Xerostomia also is known as Dry Mouth is caused by lower levels or the absence salivation within the mouth. This condition can often lead to discomfort which negatively affects your ability speak, swallowing, an ability to wear dentures, producing bad breath and compromise your oral hygiene due to reducing the oral pH and an increase in bacterial growth. Persistent xerostomia can lead to severe tooth decay and oral candidiasis. Xerostomia…

Read More >>

Understanding Bruton’s Disease ( X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia)

(Bruton’s disease) The X-linked agammaglobulinemia is characterized by low or absent immunoglobulin levels and lack of B cells, leading to recurrent infections with encapsulated bacteria. (See also Overview of immune deficiency disorders, and approach to the patient with an immunodeficiency disorder.) The X-linked agammaglobulinemia is characterized by low or absent immunoglobulin levels and lack of B cells, leading to recurrent infections with encapsulated bacteria. Agammaglobulinemia is a primary immunodeficiency disease…

Read More >>

X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome Inherited

(Duncan’s syndrome) The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is a result of a defect in the T-cells and natural killer cells and is characterized by an abnormal sensitivity to Epstein-Barr virus infections. This can lead to liver failure, immunodeficiency, lymphoma, fatal lymphoproliferative diseases or bone marrow aplasia. (See also Overview of immune deficiency disorders, and approach to the patient with an immunodeficiency disorder.) The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is a result of a…

Read More >>

X-Ray And Other Imaging Contrast Examinations

The main contraindication in X-ray contrast media studies is a suspicion of a perforation because free barium causes severe irritation to the mediastinum or peritoneum; water-soluble contrast agents are less irritating and can be used in cases of possible perforation. In elderly patients, storage and rotation for optimum positioning of barium and intraluminal air often causes difficulties. X-ray and other imaging contrast examinations are the entire GIT from the pharynx…

Read More >>

X-Ray Contrast Media And Contrast Media Reactions

Iodinated contrast agents may be Radiopaque contrast agents are often used in radiography and fluoroscopy, to distinguish boundaries between tissues of similar X-ray density. Most contrast agents containing iodine. Iodinated contrast agents may be Ionic Nonionic Ionic contrast media, the salts are hyperosmolar as compared to blood. Ionic contrast agent should be used either for myelographic investigations, nor for injections in which it into the spinal canal (neurotoxic risk side…

Read More >>

What Is Yellow Fever?

The yellow fever virus, a flavivirus, is transmitted by mosquitoes and is endemic in tropical South America and sub-Saharan Africa. The symptoms can consist of sudden fever onset, relative bradycardia, headache and, in severe cases, jaundice, hemorrhages and multiple organ failure. The diagnosis is made by a virus cell culture, reverse transcription and serological tests. Treatment is supportive. For prevention are vaccination and control of mosquitoes available. (See also Overview…

Read More >>

Vitamin E

(Tocopherol) A nutritional vitamin E deficiency is common in developing countries; a deficiency in adults rarely occurs in developed countries, which usually attributed to a fat malabsorption. The main symptoms are hemolytic anemia and neurological disorders. The diagnosis is based on the ratio of plasma alpha-tocopherol to total plasma lipids; a lower quotient value suggests a vitamin E deficiency. For therapy, high-dose vitamin E is administered orally when neurologic deficits…

Read More >>