Accepted standards for sexual behavior and attitudes toward sexuality are very different from culture to culture and within individual cultures. Health professionals should never judge sexual behavior, not even under the pressure of social expectations. Generally can not be defined medically what is sexually normal or not normal. However, if sexual behaviors or problems cause significant distress to the patient or its partners or they suffer a treatment is justified.

(Sexual dysfunction in men s overview of male sexual function;… Sexual dysfunction in women’s overview of sexual function and sexual disorders of women) standards accepted for sexual behavior and attitudes toward sexuality are very different from culture to culture and within individual cultures. Health professionals should never judge sexual behavior, not even under the pressure of social expectations. Generally can not be defined medically what is sexually normal or not normal. However, if sexual behaviors or problems cause significant distress to the patient or its partners or they suffer a treatment is justified. Societal attitudes about sexuality and gender social attitudes to sexuality and gender change with time, as the following examples show: today considered normal sexual activity throughout life once widely considered a perversion and cause of mental disorders, is masturbation: Masturbation , only then is considered abnormal when it interferes with partner-oriented behavior is performed in public or is so compulsive that it becomes a burden. The incidence is about 97% in men and 80% in women. Although masturbation is harmless, can be a significant burden of disapproval and penalty other produced guilt and affect sexual function. Masturbation often sits down to a certain extent in a sexually healthy relationship continued. Homosexuality: Homosexuality is no longer considered a failure since> 4 decades by the APA (American Psychiatric Association). Approximately 4-5% of the population looking for life as an exclusively homosexual. Just as heterosexuality and homosexuality from complex biological and environmental factors that lead to become sexually aroused by same sex arises. As heterosexuality is homosexuality not a matter of choice. Promiscuity: Frequent sexual activity with many partners, often anonymously or unique encounters may indicate a limited capacity for intimacy. However promiscuity in itself is not a sign of a psychosexual disorder. Occasional sex is common in Western cultures, although the fear of AIDS, herpes simplex infections and other sexually transmitted diseases has led to a decline. Extramarital sex: In most cultures, sexual activity outside of marriage are frowned upon but accepts sexual activity before marriage or for unmarried than normal. In the US, most unmarried men and women have sexual relationships and are thus part of the trend towards greater sexual freedom in industrialized countries. Extramarital sex comes despite social taboos for married couples frequently. This behavior brigt the possibility of transmitting diseases to unsuspecting spouses and sexual partners. Gender identity: Gender identity is a subjective feeling, to know which tribe you belong to. There is a growing cultural recognition that some people do not in the traditional male-female dichotomy fit or do not want to necessarily fit. Influence of parents on sexuality accepted standards for sexual behavior and attitudes towards sex are strongly influenced by the parents. An embossed of prohibitions, puritanical rejection of physical affection and of touches produces in children guilt and shame by parents and inhibits their ability to enjoy sex and to build healthy intimate relationships in adulthood. The relationship with parents can be damaged by excessive emotional distance Punitive behaviors Open seduction and sexual exploitation Children who are exposed to verbal or physical hostility, rejection or cruelty will develop problems likely in terms of sexual and emotional intimacy. It can, for. As lead to a separation between love and sexual arousal, so that although emotional ties to people in the same social class or the same intellectual circle can be set up, sexual relationships are only possible with people for whom there is no emotional intimacy; typically these are persons that are perceived as belonging to a lower layer or impaired in any form (z. B. prostitutes, anonymous partner). The role of the care setting professional Well-informed health professionals can empathetic in sexual questions and offer sound advice and should not miss opportunities to helping counsel. expose behaviors that patients at risk of sexually transmitted diseases must be addressed. Health professionals have the ability to recognize psychosexual problems and address, as well as sexual dysfunction (overview of male sexual function, sexual disorders of women), Genderdysphorie and paraphilias.

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