Vaginitis (vaginitis) is an infection-related or non-infection-related inflammation of the vaginal mucosa, sometimes the vulva is involved. Symptoms include vaginal discharge, irritation, itching and redness. The diagnosis is made during the consultation by examining the vaginal fluid. Treatment focuses on the cause and severity of symptoms.

Vaginitis is the most common gynecological diseases. Some of its causes affect the vulva alone (vulvitis) or in addition (vulvovaginitis).

Vaginitis (vaginitis) is an infection-related or non-infection-related inflammation of the vaginal mucosa, sometimes the vulva is involved. Symptoms include vaginal discharge, irritation, itching and redness. The diagnosis is made during the consultation by examining the vaginal fluid. Treatment focuses on the cause and severity of symptoms. Vaginitis is the most common gynecological diseases. Some of its causes affect the vulva alone (vulvitis) or in addition (vulvovaginitis). Etiology The most common causes are different, depending on the age of the patient. Children In children, vaginitis is usually the flora of the gastrointestinal tract caused (nonspecific vaginitis). One factor that often contributes in girls aged 2-6 years to be poor perineal hygiene (eg clean from back to front and waiver of hand washing after defecation;. Touch with the fingers, particularly in itching). And chemical additives in bubble baths or soaps can cause inflammation. Foreign body (eg. As toilet paper) can cause nonspecific vaginitis with bloody discharge. Sometimes vulvovaginitis in children is an infection with a specific pathogen (eg. As streptococci, staphylococci, Candida sp., Rare oxyurids) zurückzuführen.Frauen of childbearing age in these women is a vaginitis usually caused by an infection related. Most common are Bacterial vaginosis (Bacterial vaginosis (BV)) Candida vaginitis (candida vaginitis) trichomonas vaginitis (trichomoniasis), which is sexually transmitted Lactobacillus sp. is the predominant germ type of the normal vaginal flora in women of childbearing age. The colonization with this bacterium maintains the pH of the vagina in the normal range (pH 3.8-4.2) and thus prevents overgrowth of pathogenic bacteria. In addition, ensure high estrogen concentrations for a sufficiently thick vaginal mucosa, causing local immunity is strengthened. Factors that contribute to the overgrowth of pathogenic bacteria in the vagina are: An alkaline vaginal pH, caused by menstrual blood, sperm or too few lactobacilli Poor hygiene Frequent vaginal douches A vaginitis can (also by foreign objects such as a forgotten tampon. ) are formed. A non-infectious inflammatory vaginitis rarely vor.Frauen after menopause Usually the strong decrease estrogen leads to the vaginal mucosa is thinner; thus the susceptibility to infection and inflammation increases. In addition, certain treatment modalities (eg. As oophorectomy, pelvic radiation, some chemotherapy drugs) can also draw an estrogen degradation. Decreased estrogen promotes the development of inflammatory (especially atrophic) vaginitis. Poor hygiene (z. B. in incontinent or bedridden patients) can lead to chronic inflammation of the vulva due to chemical irritation caused by urine or feces or a nonspecific infection. Bacterial vaginosis, candida vaginitis and trichomonas vaginitis rarely occur in postmenopause, but then most likely in women with Risikofaktoren.Frauen of any age at any age, conditions that lead to vaginal or vulvar infection predispose fistulas between the intestines and genital tract, the intestinal flora allow the genital tract to bediedeln pelvic radiation, or tumors that break through the tissue and thus jeopardize the normal host defenses. Non-infectious vulvitis is responsible for up to 30% of vaginitis cases. It can result from a hypersensitivity or irritant reaction to hygiene sprays or perfumes, sanitary napkins, detergents, optical brighteners, fabric softeners, fabric colors, synthetic fibers, bath water additives, toilet paper or occasionally also spermicides, vaginal lubricants or creams, latex condoms, vaginal Ringkontrazeptiva or diaphragms. Symptoms and signs A vaginitis leads to a vaginal fluorine, which differs from the normal discharge. The normal vaginal discharge usually occurs at high estrogen concentrations – eg. As during the first two weeks of life, because before birth estrogen from the mother to the child passes (light bleeding can the sudden drop in estrogen levels take place), and in the months before menarche, when estrogen production increases. The normal vaginal discharge is usually milky white or clear, odorless and non-irritating; it can cause moisture in the vagina, which is strong enough to wet the underwear. Discharge due to vaginitis is accompanied by pruritus, erythema, sometimes burning, pain or light bleeding. Pruritus may interfere with sleep. Dysuria and dyspareunia are possible. In atrophic vaginitis, the outflow is sparse, dyspareunia is common, and the vaginal mucosa appears thin and dry. Although the symptoms in the respective Vaginitistypen may vary, there is a large overlap (see Table: Common Vaginitisarten). Common Vaginitisarten disease Typical symptoms and findings diagnostic criteria Microscopic findings Differential Diagnosis Bacterial vaginosis Gray thinner vaginal discharge with fishy odor, often with pruritus and skin irritation; no dyspareunia Three of the following criteria: gray vaginal discharge, pH> 4.5, fishy odor, clue cells (clue cells) key cells (English clue cells.), reduction of bacilli multiplication of Kokkobazillen trichomonas vaginitis candida vaginitis Viscous, white discharge, vaginal and sometimes vulvar pruritus with or without burning, skin irritation or dyspareunia Typical discharge, pH <4.5 and microscopic findings * Hefeknospen, pseudohyphae or mycelia; best with 10% potassium hydroxide to see contact irritation or allergic vulvitis Chemical irritation Vulvodynia trichomonas vaginitis Profuse, fetid, yellow-green discharge, dysuria, dyspareunia, redness Microscopic identification * of the pathogen (possibly through culture) Portable Geißelprotozoen, increased granulocyte Bacterial Inflammatory vaginosis vaginitis Inflammatory vaginitis Purulent discharge, dryness and thinning of the vaginal tissue, dyspareunia, dysuria; mostly in women after menopause pH> 6, negative odor sample and characteristic microscopic findings Increased granulocytes, parabasal cells and cocci, bacilli decreased Erosive Lichen Planus * culture is needed if the microscopic findings are negative or symptoms occur. Speculum in vaginitis with permission of the publisher. From Spitzer M., Mann M. In Atlas of Clinical Gynecology: Gynecologic Pathology. Edited by M. Stenchever (Series Editor) and B. Goff. Philadelphia, Current Medicine, 1998. (. Courtesy of the International Society for the Study of Vulvar Disease, from the collection of the late Dr. Herman Gardner) var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/ – / media / manual / professional / images / speculum_exam_vaginitis_high_de.jpg lang = en & thn = 0 & mw = 350 ‘, imageUrl’? /-/media/manual/professional/images/speculum_exam_vaginitis_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0 ‘, title:’ speculum in vaginitis ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v37897208 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eVon to right are left normal findings

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