Uveitis is an inflammation of the central eye skin – defines the iris, the ciliary body and the choroid. However, the retina and the liquid in the anterior chamber and the vitreous body are also often affected. In most cases it is idiopathic, and is believed to be autoimmune; the detectable causes include trauma, infections and systemic diseases, many of which are autoimmune. Symptoms include reduced vision, eye pain, redness, photophobia and suspended particles. Although the uveitis is clinically recognized, requires the identification of the cause usually tests. Treatment depends on the cause, but normally comprises a topical, local or systemic corticosteroids injected with a topical zykloplegisch-mydriatic drug. Non-corticosteroid immunosuppressants can be used in severe and persistent cases.

The uveitis is anatomically classified as

Uveitis is an inflammation of the central eye skin – defines the iris, the ciliary body and the choroid. However, the retina and the liquid in the anterior chamber and the vitreous body are also often affected. In most cases it is idiopathic, and is believed to be autoimmune; the detectable causes include trauma, infections and systemic diseases, many of which are autoimmune. Symptoms include reduced vision, eye pain, redness, photophobia and suspended particles. Although the uveitis is clinically recognized, requires the identification of the cause usually tests. Treatment depends on the cause, but normally comprises a topical, local or systemic corticosteroids injected with a topical zykloplegisch-mydriatic drug. Non-corticosteroid immunosuppressants can be used in severe and persistent cases. Uveitis is classified anatomically as anterior uveitis: It is located primarily in the anterior segment of the eye and includes iritis (inflammation only in the anterior chamber) and iridocyclitis (inflammation in the anterior chamber and the front glass body) with an intermediate uveitis (peripheral uveitis or chronic cyclitis): it is in the vitreous posterior uveitis: Any form of retinitis, choroiditis or Papillenentz√ľndung panuveitis (also called diffuse uveitis): Both the front and the rear chamber are inflamed uveitis may occur with or without vitritis, retinitis, papillitis or optic neuritis. Etiology The causes of anterior uveitis Idiopathic postoperatively (the most common cause) Trauma (probably the second most common cause) spondyloarthropathies Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis herpes virus (herpes simplex and varicella zoster infection) The causes of uveitis intermedia or idiopathic (most common) Multiple sclerosis sarcoidosis TB syphilis Lyme disease (in endemic areas) the last five make this list unusual causes of intermediate uveitis. the causes of posterior uveitis (retinitis) is idiopathic (most common) toxoplasmosis (in immunocompetent patients) CMV (in patients with HIV / AIDS) are the causes of panuveitis Idiopathic (most common) sarcoidosis Rarely uveitis is caused systemic drugs (usually anterior uveitis). Examples include sulfonamides, pamidronate (inhibits bone resorption), rifabutin and cidofovir. Systemic diseases that lead to uveitis and their treatment are discussed elsewhere in the MSD Manual. Symptoms and discomfort symptoms and complaints can be subtle and vary depending on location and severity of the inflammation. The anterior uveitis is symptomatic and most frequently manifests itself usually with pain (eye pain) Redness photophobia visual loss (to varying degrees) complaints include hyperemia of the cornea adjacent conjunctiva (red eyes or limbal injection). Slit lamp findings include corneal precipitates (blood clots on the inner surface of the cornea), cells, and flare (haze) in the anterior chamber (aqueous), and posterior synechiae. With severe anterior uveitis to blood clots (hypopyon) can be deposited in the anterior chamber. Uveitis (anterior) courtesy of Drs. Rand Allingham and Joseph Halabi about the Online Journal of Ophthalmology (www.onjoph.com). var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/uveitis_anterior_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/uveitis_anterior_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ uveitis (anterior) ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v37894322 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eIn this image illuminated by a slit lamp of the cornea (right light reflection) and the aqueous humor (average light reflection) to the iris (left light reflection). Cells (tiny white dots) and relapses (diffuse blur) in the aqueous humor in the middle gap of light are typical signs of anterior uveitis u003c / p u003e u003c / div u003e. ‘Credits’ courtesy of Drs Rand Allingham and. Joseph Halabi about the online Journal of Ophthalmology (www.onjoph.com) ‘hideCredits: false

Health Life Media Team

Leave a Reply