The exposure to inhalation of the environment has long been considered a risk factor for asthma (occupational asthma) known, but it is also increasingly recognized as a cause of COPD recognized in non-smokers (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)). The American Thoracic Society estimates that the proportion of people with COPD, which is due to occupational and environmental pollution, to about 20% (i. E. COPD incidence and mortality would decline by about 20% when the environmental impact to zero would be reduced).

Environmental lung disease caused by inhalation of dust, allergens, chemicals, gases and environmental pollutants. The lungs are continuously exposed to the external environment and susceptible to a number of environmental diseases. Pathophysiologically all areas of the lungs may be involved, respiratory incl. (Z. B. with occupational asthma, “Reactive Airway Dysfunction Syndrome” or pollutant inhalation), interstitial (z. B. with pneumoconiosis or extrinsic allergic alveolitis) and pleura (z. B. . with asbestos-related diseases). The exposure to inhalation of the environment has long been considered a risk factor for asthma (occupational asthma) known, but it is also increasingly recognized as a cause of COPD recognized in non-smokers (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)). The American Thoracic Society estimates that the proportion of people with COPD, which is due to occupational and environmental pollution, to about 20% (i. E. COPD incidence and mortality would decline by about 20% when the environmental impact to zero would be reduced). Doctors should charge an occupational and environmental history in all patients, particularly after past and present exposure to vapors, gases, dust, smoke and / or smoke from biomass (d. E. From burning wood, animal waste, cereals). Any positive reaction should be followed by more detailed questions. The prevention of occupational and environmental lung diseases focuses on the avoidance of exposure (primary prevention). The exposure can be limited through the use of administrative controls (z. B. limiting the number of people who are exposed to dangerous situations) Technical protective measures (z. B. housings, ventilation systems, safe cleansing procedure) Product substitution (z. B. Use safer, less toxic materials) respirators (z. B. respirator helmet, dust mask, gas mask) Many doctors will mistakenly assume that a patient who has worn a respirator helmet or other breathing apparatus, is well protected. Although respiratory protection helmets provide some protection, especially those in which fresh air is out of a container or air hose available, the benefit is limited and varies from person to person. If they recommend the use of a respirator helmet, doctors should consider several factors: working with a cardiovascular disease can possibly engage in any strenuous activities when they need to wear an breathing apparatus with a closed system (with fresh air tank). Respiratory protection helmets that fit snugly and require that the wearer has to breathe air through a filter cartridge can increase the work of breathing, which can be particularly difficult, especially for patients with asthma, COPD or interstitial lung diseases. Medical surveillance is a form of secondary prevention. The workers medical examinations should be offered by the disease can be detected at an early stage and so long-term effects can be reduced.

Health Life Media Team

Leave a Reply