A nichtsuizidale self-injury is a self-inflicted act that causes pain or superficial damage, but does not intend to die.

Although the methods used sometimes overlap with those of suicide attempts (eg. B. cutting the wrists with a razor blade), nichtsuizidale self-injury is distinguished from suicide because the patient did not intend to kill himself. The patient may particularly lack of intent or the defect can be derived by their repeated use of clearly non-lethal methods. Although no direct lethality is, the long-term risk of suicide attempts and suicide is increased and thus a non-suicidal self-injury should not be easily dismissed.

A nichtsuizidale self-injury is a self-inflicted act that causes pain or superficial damage, but does not intend to die. Although the methods used sometimes overlap with those of suicide attempts (eg. B. cutting the wrists with a razor blade), nichtsuizidale self-injury is distinguished from suicide because the patient did not intend to kill himself. The patient may particularly lack of intent or the defect can be derived by their repeated use of clearly non-lethal methods. Although no direct lethality is, the long-term risk of suicide attempts and suicide is increased and thus a non-suicidal self-injury should not be easily dismissed. The most common examples of nichtsuizidale self-injury are cutting or stabbing with a sharp object into the skin (eg. As a knife, razor blade, needle) burning the skin (usually with a cigarette) Patients injured repeated in a single session and cause multiple lesions in the same location, typically in a visible and / or accessible area (z. B. forearms front of the thighs). The behavior is repeated, resulting in extensive patterns of scars. Patients are often occupied with thoughts about the damaging actions. Nichtsuizidale self-inflicted injuries tend to begin in early adolescence, and the prevalence is more evenly distributed between the sexes than that of suicidal behavior. The pathogenetic development is unclear, but the behavior seems to decrease in young adulthood. The reasons for non-suicidal self-injury are unclear, but self-harm can be a way to reduce stress or negative feelings, one way internal problems to solve, or it can be a self-punishment for perceived mistakes or a request for help. Some patients see the self-injury as a positive activity, and therefore do not tend to seek advice or to accept. Nichtsuizidale self-injury is often accompanied by other disorders, particularly borderline personality disorder, eating disorders and substance abuse. Diagnostic exclusion of suicidal behavior assessment of self-injury The diagnosis of non-suicidal self-injury must exclude suicidal behavior. The assessment of non-suicidal self-injury as of suicidal behavior is important before treatment begins. The promotion of discussion with the patient about self-injury is essential for an adequate assessment and helps doctors to plan treatment. Doctors can by doing the following facilitate such discussions: Validate the patient’s experience by giving him to understand that they have heard him and take his experiences seriously to understand the emotions of the patient (eg confirm that. feelings of the patient and his actions are understandable considering his circumstances) the assessment should include: determining what type of injury and how many types of injuries to the patient were added determining how often non-suicidal self-injury occurs and how long they occurred determine which function nichtsuizidale self-harm for the patient has testing for co-existing psychiatric disorders assessment of the risk of a suicide attempt determining how ready the patient is to contribute to the treatment therapy Sometimes, certain types of psychotherapy The treatment of coexisting diseases The following psychotherapy may be useful for treatment of non-suicidal self-injury: Dialectical Behavoriale therapy (DBT) Group therapy for emotion regulation (ERGT) DBT includes individual and group therapy for 1 year. ERGT takes place in a 14-week group setting. There are no drugs that have been approved for the treatment of non-suicidal self-injury. However, naltrexone and certain atypical antipsychotics are effective in some patients. Co-existing psychiatric disorders (e.g. depression, eating disorders, substance abuse, borderline personality disorder) should be treated accordingly. Patients should be referred to a need for a doctor. Further appointments should be agreed.

Health Life Media Team

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