The term “Non-erosive gastritis” includes a variety of pathological and histological findings that occur mainly as a result of H. pylori infection (Helicobacter pylori infection). Most patients are asymptomatic. The diagnosis is made endoscopically. The treatment consists in the eradication of H. pylori and sometimes in acid suppression.

The term “Non-erosive gastritis” includes a variety of pathological and histological findings that occur mainly as a result of H. pylori infection (Helicobacter pylori infection). Most patients are asymptomatic. The diagnosis is made endoscopically. The treatment consists in the eradication of H. pylori and sometimes in acid suppression. Pathology superficial gastritis One finds a mixed cell infiltrate consisting of lymphocytes, plasma cells and neutrophils. Inflammation is superficial and affects the antrum, the body or both. Atrophy or metaplasia is not usually seen. The prevalence of the disease increases with age zu.Tiefe gastritis A profound gastritis is often symptomatic (z. B. vague dyspepsia). Mononuclear cells and neutrophils infiltrate the entire mucosa to the submucosa, but exudates or crypt abscesses are less common than one would expect in such an infiltration. The distribution is patchy. Simultaneously, a superficial gastritis, partial Drüsenatrophie and a metaplasia can exist sein.Magenatrophie An atrophy of the gastric glands may be due to gastritis, usually a lengthy antral (sometimes referred to as type B). Some patients with gastric atrophy form autoantibodies against parietal cells, usually in association with a corpus gastritis (type A) and pernicious anemia. Atrophy can occur without specific symptoms. Endoscopically the mucosa may appear normal, unless atrophy is advanced, so that submucosal vessels are visible. For a complete atrophy of the secretion of acid and pepsin is reduced and intrinsic factor may be lost, leading to vitamin B12 malabsorption führt.Metaplasie Two forms of metaplasia are common in chronic gastritis nichterosiven: metaplasia of the mucous glands and intestinal metaplasia. Metaplasia of the mucous glands (pseudopylorische metaplasia) is common in severe atrophy of the gastric glands, which increasingly by mucous glands (Antrumschleimhaut), v. a. are along the lesser curvature, replaced. Gastric ulcers can occur (typically at the junction of the antrum to body mucosa), but whether they are a cause or consequence of these metaplastic changes is not clear. The intestinal metaplasia typically begins in the antrum in response to chronic mucosal injury and can extend up into the body. The gastric mucosa cells change in the direction of the small intestinal mucosa – with goblet cells, endocrine (enterochromaffin or enterochromaffinähnlichen) cells and rudimentary villi – and even functional (resorbing) accept properties. The intestinal metaplasia is classified histologically as complete (most common) or incomplete form. When complete metaplasia gastric mucosa is completely transformed into the small intestinal mucosa and secrete Although histologically and functionally, to resorb with the ability nutrients and peptides. In incomplete metaplasia, the epithelium histologically closely resembles that of the colon, often containing dysplasia. Intestinal metaplasia may lead to the development of gastric carcinoma. Symptoms and complaints The majority of patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis are asymptomatic, some may have a slight dyspepsia or other vague symptoms. Often, the findings are revealed in a study carried out for other reasons endoscopy. The study of asymptomatic patients is not indicated. Is a gastritis once identified, investigations are mounted on H. pylori. Diagnostic Endoscopy Often, the findings are revealed in a study carried out for other reasons endoscopy. The study of asymptomatic patients is not indicated. Is a gastritis once identified, investigations are mounted on H. pylori. Therapy eradication of H. pylori Occasionally acid suppression drugs The treatment of chronic gastritis nichterosiven is the H. pylori eradication (Helicobacter pylori infection: therapy). Treatment of asymptomatic patients, in view of the high prevalence of H. pylori associated gastritis surface and the relatively low incidence of clinical consequences (z. B. peptic ulcer disease) controversial. However, H. pylori is a class J carcinogen; eradication eliminates the risk of cancer. In H. pylori-negative patients the treatment is directed using acid-suppressive drugs (eg. As H2 blockers, proton pump inhibitors) or antacids on the symptoms.

Health Life Media Team

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