Myofascial pain syndrome (formerly known as myofascial pain and Dysftionssyndrom [MFPDS] known) can occur with a normal TMJ patients. It is characterized by stress, fatigue or spasms in the muscles of mastication causes (medial pterygoid or the internal and the external or lateral, temporalis and masseter). Symptoms include around bruxism, pain and tenderness in and around the masticatory apparatus or to other locations in the head and neck, radiating and often anomalies of jaw movement. Diagnosis is based on history and physical examination. A conservative treatment consisting of analgesics, muscle relaxation, change of Habits and bite splints is usually effective and sufficient.

This syndrome is the most common disease of the TMJ region. It is more common in women and has a bimodal age distribution in the early 20s and during menopause.

Myofascial pain syndrome (formerly known as myofascial pain and Dysftionssyndrom [MFPDS] known) can occur with a normal TMJ patients. It is characterized by stress, fatigue or spasms in the muscles of mastication causes (medial pterygoid or the internal and the external or lateral, temporalis and masseter). Symptoms include around bruxism, pain and tenderness in and around the masticatory apparatus or to other locations in the head and neck, radiating and often anomalies of jaw movement. Diagnosis is based on history and physical examination. A conservative treatment consisting of analgesics, muscle relaxation, change of Habits and bite splints is usually effective and sufficient. This syndrome is the most common disease of the TMJ region. It is more common in women and has a bimodal age distribution in the early 20s and during menopause. The muscle spasm that causes the disease, are usually the result of nocturnal bruxism (pressing or Z√§hneknirschen- bruxism). Whether bruxism is caused by uneven tooth contacts, emotional stress or insomnia is controversial. Bruxism usually has a multifactorial etiology. The myofascial pain syndrome is not limited to the muscles of mastication. It can occur anywhere on the body, most commonly the muscles involved in the neck and back. Symptoms and signs Symptoms include pain and tenderness of the jaw muscles and often painful and limited jaw movement. Both nocturnal bruxism and sleep-related breathing disorders (such as obstructive sleep apnea and upper airway resistance syndrome Obstructive sleep apnea) lead to headaches, which are stronger when you wake up and gradually ease during the day. Such pain must be distinguished from a giant (giant). The daytime symptoms, including exhaustion of the jaw muscle, jaw pain and headaches can become worse when the grinding or clenching continues even during the day. The pine gives way to the mouth from, but not usually so suddenly or not at the same point of the mouth as the disc displacement of the inner temporomandibular joint (TMJ disc displacement of the inner). With light pressure, the examiner can open the mouth of the patient for a further 1 to 3 mm over the passive maximum mouth opening. Diagnosis Clinical evaluation Sometimes polysomnography A simple test can help diagnose: Two or three tongue depressors are placed between the rear molars on both sides and the patient is asked to gently close the mouth. Caused thereby in the joint space distraction can alleviate symptoms. X-rays do not help, as a rule, except for the exclusion of arthritis. When a giant cell is suspected, the ESR value is measured. The polysomnography should be performed when a sleep-related breathing disorder is suspected. Therapy Light analgesics rail or mouthguard A anxiolytics before bedtime can be considered Physical therapy drag as treatment into consideration A custom built by the dentist plastic rail or a mouth guard may prevent the contact between the rows of teeth and thus the damage caused by bruxism. Convenient, moldable heat rails are available in many sporting goods stores or drug stores; but this kind of bars should be used briefly and only as a temporary diagnostic tool. Because teeth can move, mouthguards, which are made by a dentist and adapted to recommend are. Low doses of benzodiazepines before bedtime is effective for acute exacerbations and temporary relief of symptoms often; However, in patients with associated sleep disorders such as sleep apnea, anxiolytics and muscle relaxants, they should be used with caution because they can worsen these conditions. Light analgesics such as NSAIDs or acetaminophen are indexed. Cyclobenzaprine may be helpful for some people to relax the muscles. Because the disease is chronic, opioids should not be used, except perhaps for a short time in acute exacerbations. The patient must learn to stop pressing the jaw and gnashing of teeth when you wake up. Hard to chew food and chewing gum should be avoided. Physical therapy, biofeedback to support relaxation and counseling help some patients. Among the physical treatments transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation include (TENS rehabilitative measures for the treatment of pain and inflammation: electrical stimulation), and “spraying and stretching” in which the mouth is expanded after the skin over the painful region cooled with ice, or with a skin-cooling agents such as ethyl chloride was sprayed. Botulinum toxin has been used successfully in recent times to release muscle spasms in myofascial pain syndrome. In most patients appear within two to three years, even without treatment, no significant symptoms more. Summary myofascial pain syndrome is a common cause of TMJ pain as from a disc displacement of the temporomandibular joint. Tension, fatigue and spasms of the jaw muscles are results of nocturnal bruxism. The patients suffer from pain and tenderness of the jaw muscles, schmerzhafterr limitation of jaw movement and sometimes a headache. Nightly use of splints or mouth guards and a benzodiazepine can help with nichtopioden analgesics.

Health Life Media Team

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