Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis

(Mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis; lobular glomerulonephritis)

The membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis is a heterogeneous group of disorders with common nephritic and nephrotic characteristics and microscopic findings. They usually affects children. The cause is an immune complex deposition – idiopathic or due to a systemic disorder. The diagnosis is made by renal biopsy. The prognosis is generally poor. The treatment, if indicated, consists in the administration of corticosteroids and antiplatelet drugs.

The membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis is a group of immune-mediated disorders that histologically by thickening of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and proliferative changes in light microscopy are presented. There are 3 forms of which each primary (idiopathic) or secondary causes can have. Primary forms affect children and young adults between the 8th and 30th year and make up 10% of nephrotic syndrome in children, while the secondary forms rather adults relate to> 30 years. Men and women are equally affected. Reports of familial cases have at least in some forms suggest genetic factors. Men and women are equally affected. Many factors contribute to the hypocomplementemia.

The membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis is a heterogeneous group of disorders with common nephritic and nephrotic characteristics and microscopic findings. They usually affects children. The cause is an immune complex deposition – idiopathic or due to a systemic disorder. The diagnosis is made by renal biopsy. The prognosis is generally poor. The treatment, if indicated, consists in the administration of corticosteroids and antiplatelet drugs. The membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis is a group of immune-mediated disorders that histologically by thickening of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and proliferative changes in light microscopy are presented. There are 3 forms of which each primary (idiopathic) or secondary causes can have. Primary forms affect children and young adults between the 8th and 30th year and make up 10% of nephrotic syndrome in children, while the secondary forms rather adults relate to> 30 years. Men and women are equally affected. Reports of familial cases have at least in some forms suggest genetic factors. Men and women are equally affected. Many factors contribute to the hypocomplementemia. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, Type 1 Type I (mesangial proliferation with immune complex deposits) accounts for 80-85% of cases. The idiopathic form is rare. Type I occurs most often secondary to one of the following diseases on Systemic immune complex disorder (. E.g., SLE, mixed cryoglobulinemia, Sjogren’s syndrome), chronic infections (e.g., bacterial endocarditis, HIV infection, hepatitis B or C. infection, visceral abscesses, ventriculoatrial shunt infection) cancer (eg. as chronic lymphocytic leukemia, lymphoma, melanoma) Other diseases (z. B. partial lipodystrophy, C2 or C3 defects, sarcoidosis, thrombotic microangiopathy) Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, type 1 Figure (provided by Agnes Fogo, MD, and the American Journal of Kidney Disease, Atlas of Renal Pathology see www.aj kd.org). var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/membranoproliferative_glomerulonephritis_type_i_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/membranoproliferative_glomerulonephritis_type_i_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type 1 ‘, description:’ u003Ca id = “v38396951 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eBei membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type I a chronic immune complex deposition activated (primarily C3 and IgG or IgM) complement via the classical pathway within the glomerular capillary walls and the mesangium. As a result

Health Life Media Team

Leave a Reply