Melatonin

Melatonin is a hormone which is produced by the pineal gland (pineal) and regulates the circadian rhythm. It can be derived from animals, but most of melatonin is produced synthetically. In some countries, melatonin is considered a drug and treated as such.

(See also nutritional supplements Overview.) Melatonin is a hormone produced by the pineal gland (pineal) is formed and regulates the circadian rhythm. It can be derived from animals, but most of melatonin is produced synthetically. In some countries, melatonin is considered a drug and treated as such. Allegations Melatonin is used for the short-term regulation of sleep patterns, including jet lag and insomnia. Research into the use of melatonin supplement for people who suffer from seasonal affective disorder, for the regulation of the sleep pattern in people who work in late shifts and for re-synchronization of the sleep / wake cycle in people with early Alzheimer’s disease is currently being evaluated. Some documents scientific evidence supports the use of melatonin to minimize the effects of jet lag, particularly in people who fly over 2-5 time zones to the east (1-2). However, it was shown in a very precise study found that melatonin supplements symptoms of jet lag (3) can not alleviate. Only a few small studies suggest that these supplements may reduce the symptoms of jet lag (4-5) and show that clinical trial tests are not consistent. A standard dose has not yet been determined, but is likely to between 0.5 and 5 mg Melatonin p.o. move (one hour before the usual bedtime on the day of travel, and another 2-4 days after arrival). Whether melatonin may be suitable as a sleep aid for adults and children with neuropsychiatric disorders (eg. As pervasive developmental disorders), is less well documented. Side effects “Hangover” -Schläfrigkeit, headaches and transient depression occur. Melatonin can enhance an existing depression. Theoretically, there is a risk of infection by prions, since melatonin is from animal neural tissue. Drug interactions There is evidence that melatonin can increase the effect of warfarin, which increases the risk of bleeding. Notes on melatonin Herxheimer A, Petrie KJ. Melatonin for the prevention and treatment of jet lag. Cochrane Database Syst Rev (2): CD001520, 2002. Buscemi N, Vander Meer B, Pandya R, et al. Melatonin for Treatment of Sleep Disorders. AHRQ publication no. 05-E002-2, 2004. Edwards BJ, Atkinson G, Waterhouse J, et al. Following Use of melatonin in recovery from jet-lag on eastward flight across 10 time-zones. Ergonomics 43 (10): 1501-1513, 2000. Claus Trat B, Brun J, David M, et al. Melatonin and jet lag: confirmatory result, a simplified protocol. Biol Psychiatry 3 (8): 705-711, 1992. K Petrie, Dawson AG, L Thompson, et al. A double-blind trial of melatonin as a treatment for jet lag in international cabin crew. Biol Psychiatry 33 (7): 526-530., 1993

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