Lymphangitis

The lymphangitis is an acute bacterial infection (usually streptococci) of peripheral lymph vessels.

The lymphangitis is an acute bacterial infection (usually streptococci) of peripheral lymph vessels.

(Lymphadenitis). The lymphangitis is an acute bacterial infection (usually streptococci) of the peripheral lymphatics. Among the rare triggers include staph infections, Pasteurella infections, Erysipelothrix, anthrax, herpes simplex infections, lymphogranuloma venereum, rickettsial infections, sporotrichosis, Nocardia infections, leishmaniasis, tularemia, Burkholderia infections and atypical mycobacterial infections. The pathogens enter through small skin lesions, wounds or an accompanying infection (usually a cellulitis) in the lymph vessels. Particularly at risk are patients with underlying lymphedema. On the extremity to red, irregular, over-heated, druckdolente strips that extend from a peripheral lesion in the proximal direction to the regional lymph nodes that enlarged and usually are painful to touch form. General symptoms (eg. As fever, chills, tachycardia, headache) are possible and may be increased, as one might guess skin findings. Leukocytosis is common. Bacteremia may occur. A rare cellulitis developed as a result of the primary lymphangitis with abscess, necrosis and ulceration along the involved lymphatic ducts. The diagnosis is made clinically. The isolation of the responsible germ is usually not required. Most cases respond rapidly to streptococcus effective antibiotics to (cellulite). If the improvement achieved by treating low or presentation is unusual, rare pathogens should be considered.

Health Life Media Team

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