Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal, the pressure on the spinal cord or the root of the sciatic nerve in front of the outlet exerts from the foramina. This results in position-dependent back pain, symptoms of nerve root compression and pain in the lower extremities when walking or when loaded.

Spinal stenosis can be congenital or acquired. It can affect both the cervical and lumbar spine. An acquired LSS is a common cause of sciatica in middle-aged and elderly patients. The most common reasons for LSS are osteoarthritis, degenerative disc disease, spondylosis and spondylolisthesis with compression of the cauda equina. Other causes include the Paget’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis one.

Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal, the pressure on the spinal cord or the root of the sciatic nerve in front of the outlet exerts from the foramina. This results in position-dependent back pain, symptoms of nerve root compression and pain in the lower extremities when walking or when loaded. Spinal stenosis can be congenital or acquired. It can affect both the cervical and lumbar spine. An acquired LSS is a common cause of sciatica in middle-aged and elderly patients. The most common reasons for LSS are osteoarthritis, degenerative disc disease, spondylosis and spondylolisthesis with compression of the cauda equina. Other causes include the Paget’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis one. Degenerative spondylolisthesis of L4 © Springer Science + Business Media var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/544-degenerative-spondylolisthesis-of-l4-s138-springer-high_de.jpg?la=de&thn= 0 & mw = 350 ‘, imageUrl’ /-/media/manual/professional/images/544-degenerative-spondylolisthesis-of-l4-s138-springer-high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0 ‘, title:’ degenerative spondylolisthesis L4 ‘, description:’ u003Ca id = “v37892757 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eDie illustration on the left side is a lateral radiograph of the lumbar spine showing the slipping forward of the L4 vertebra (black arrow). The figure in the middle is a midsagittaler MR scan

Health Life Media Team

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