Linear Iga Bullous Dermatosis

The linear IgA disease is a rare, blistering disease, which is different to the basement membrane of the Pemphigoidund bullous dermatitis herpetiformis by the linear IgA deposits.

Linear IgA disease has two main clinical variants: the bullous disease of childhood and linear IgA disease in adults. Although they vary clinically in a small way, their immunofluorescence patterns are identical. IgA autoantibodies work specifically to several antigens in the dermal-epidermal junction.

The linear IgA disease is a rare, blistering disease, which is different to the basement membrane of the Pemphigoidund bullous dermatitis herpetiformis by the linear IgA deposits. Linear IgA disease has two main clinical variants: the bullous disease of childhood and linear IgA disease in adults. Although they vary clinically in a small way, their immunofluorescence patterns are identical. IgA autoantibodies work specifically to several antigens in the dermal-epidermal junction. Infection and penicillins tripping over a quarter of the cases in children and adults. Vancomycin, diclofenac and NSAIDs are also assumed to be causes. The risk of developing the linear IgA disease, in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease (possibly with a related pathophysiology, when it comes to the formation of autoantibodies) or lymphoproliferative cancers (in adults), but not in patients with other autoimmune diseases, increased. Symptoms and signs In linear IgA disease occur the vesicular or bullous skin lesions often grouped (herpetiform) on. In young children, face and perineum are often involved. Spread to the limbs, torso, hands and feet as well as on the scalp is common. In adults, the torso is almost always involved. In addition, the scalp, the face and the limbs are often involved in them. The lesions are often itchy and can burn. A mucosal involvement is common in both age groups. Milia are not characteristic. Diagnostic skin biopsy and direct immunofluorescence The diagnosis of linear immunoglobulin A disease by means of skin biopsy and direct immunofluorescence. The histological features are non-specific, but direct immunofluorescence shows IgA deposits in a linear fashion along the basement membrane. Therapy setting the causative medication In mild cases, topical corticosteroids for children, erythromycin A drug-induced disease can only be treated with the withdrawal of the causative agent. Mild cases can be treated with topical corticosteroids. Erythromycin can be used in children. are alternatives to this dapsone, sulfonamides (with doses and precautions similar to those in dermatitis herpetiformis and colchicine. Often the skin will appeal against the mucosal lesions to treatment. Spontaneous remission occurs after 3-6 years in most patients.

Health Life Media Team

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