Lethal Insomnia

(Fatal familial insomnia)

The lethal insomnia (FI) is a rare hereditary or sporadic prion disease that causes difficulty sleeping and motor dysfunction and fatal.

Lethal insomnia is usually caused by an autosomal dominant mutation, but some sporadic cases have been identified.

The lethal insomnia (FI) is a rare hereditary or sporadic prion disease that causes difficulty sleeping and motor dysfunction and fatal. Lethal insomnia is usually caused by an autosomal dominant mutation, but some sporadic cases have been identified. The average age of onset is 40 years (range from the late 3rd to the late 7th decade of life). Life expectancy is 7-73 months. Early symptoms of fatal insomnia have difficulty falling asleep and difficulty staying asleep, as well as cognitive decline, ataxia and psychiatric symptoms. Sympathetic hyperactivity (eg. As hypertension, tachycardia, hyperthermia, sweating) can occur later. A fatal insomnia should be considered when patients have rapidly progressing cognitive impairment that is accompanied by behavioral or mood changes, ataxia, and sleep disorders. The suspicion of fatal insomnia should consider a sleep study using polysomnography to be. A genetic test can confirm the diagnosis of familial form. MRI and Liquorbestimmung of 14-3-3 protein and tau are not useful, however, polysomnography and PET can (which thalamic hypometabolism shows) confirm the diagnosis. There is only supportive treatment for fatal insomnia.

Health Life Media Team

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