Legg-Calve-Perthes Syndrome

The Legg-Calve-Perthes syndrome is an idiopathic aseptic necrosis of the femoral epiphysis.

The Legg-Calve-Perthes syndrome occurs most often between the ages of 5 and 10 years on, more often in boys and usually unilateral. Approximately 10% of cases are familial. The characteristic symptoms are pain in the hip joint and gait disorders (eg. As claudication). Some children complain of knee pain. The onset is gradual, and the progression is insidious. The movements in the joint are limited and the thigh muscles may atrophy.

The Legg-Calve-Perthes syndrome is an idiopathic aseptic necrosis of the femoral epiphysis. The Legg-Calve-Perthes syndrome occurs most often between the ages of 5 and 10 years on, more often in boys and usually unilateral. Approximately 10% of cases are familial. The characteristic symptoms are pain in the hip joint and gait disorders (eg. As claudication). Some children complain of knee pain. The onset is gradual, and the progression is insidious. The movements in the joint are limited and the thigh muscles may atrophy. Diagnostic X-rays usually magnetic resonance imaging Diagnosis is suspected on the basis of symptoms. Usually radiographs are taken and, if necessary, a magnetic resonance imaging to confirm the diagnosis and the extent of the lesion. X-rays are initially may not help in the diagnosis, they may be normal or show minimal flattening. Later Röngtenbilder may represent a fragmentation of the femoral head showing areas reinforced ray transmittance and sclerosis. In bilateral or familial cases an x-ray of the skeletal system should exclude other congenital skeletal disorders, especially the epiphyseal dysplasia, because the prognosis and optimal treatment differ. Hypothyroidism, sickle cell disease and trauma must also be excluded. Treatment rest and immobilization Sometimes surgery to orthopedic treatment may include the femoral head to extended bed rest, a mobile extension, Slings Abduktionsgipse and rails. Some experts advise a subtrochanteric osteotomy with a femoral nail and early mobilization. Bisphosphonates were effective in initial tests, but further studies are needed. In untreated cases, the course is extended but self-limited (usually 2-3 years). If the disease eventually comes to rest, predispose the remaining distortion of the femoral head and the acetabulum to secondary degenerative osteoarthritis. With treatment, the consequences are less serious. Young children and children with lower femuraler destruction in the diagnosis have the best prognosis.

Health Life Media Team

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