Laryngitis

Laryngitis or laryngitis is usually caused by viruses or overuse. It causes an acute change of voice (lower volume and hoarseness). Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria. If symptoms persist for more than 3 weeks, laryngoscopy is required. A Viruslaryngitis subsides on its own. Under certain circumstances, other infectious causes or irritation must be discussed separately.

Most commonly an acute laryngitis is caused by viral respiratory infections. Accompanying cough can for. As occur with bronchitis, pneumonia, influenza, whooping cough, measles and diphtheria. Excessive use of the voice (especially by loud talking and singing), allergic reactions, gastroesophageal reflux, bulimia or tear gas inhalation (z. B. cigarette smoke, certain medications in aerosol form) can also lead to acute or chronic laryngitis. Drugs can induce a potentially live-threatening laryngeal edema, z. B. as a side effect of ACE inhibitors. Bacterial laryngitis is extremely rare. Smoking can lead to a Reinke’s edema, which is an aqueous swelling of the vocal cords.

Laryngitis or laryngitis is usually caused by viruses or overuse. It causes an acute change of voice (lower volume and hoarseness). Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria. If symptoms persist for more than 3 weeks, laryngoscopy is required. A Viruslaryngitis subsides on its own. Under certain circumstances, other infectious causes or irritation must be discussed separately. Most commonly an acute laryngitis is caused by viral respiratory infections. Accompanying cough can for. As occur with bronchitis, pneumonia, influenza, whooping cough, measles and diphtheria. Excessive use of the voice (especially by loud talking and singing), allergic reactions, gastroesophageal reflux, bulimia or tear gas inhalation (z. B. cigarette smoke, certain medications in aerosol form) can also lead to acute or chronic laryngitis. Drugs can induce a potentially live-threatening laryngeal edema, z. B. as a side effect of ACE inhibitors. Bacterial laryngitis is extremely rare. Smoking can lead to a Reinke’s edema, which is an aqueous swelling of the vocal cords. Symptoms and signs The most prominent symptom of laryngitis is usually an unnatural change of voice is typical that it is significantly weaker, up to aphonia in some patients. Depending on the severity of laryngitis, symptoms can adjust as hoarseness, scratching / tickling in the throat, hoarse voice and constant Räusperzwang. Symptoms vary with the severity of inflammation. In case of major infectious fever can be added malaise, difficulty swallowing and sore throat. A laryngeal edema is rare, but can cause stridor and dyspnea. Diagnosis Clinical evaluation Sometimes indirect or direct laryngoscopy The diagnosis of laryngitis is based on the symptoms. If symptoms persist for more than 3 weeks, an indirect or direct laryngoscopy recommends a flexible laryngoscope. Among the findings in laryngitis include a mild to more pronounced mucosal erythema, which may also be edematous. At reflux a swelling of the inner lining of the larynx as well as redness of the arytenoid cartilage is present. Pseudomembranes suspected diphtheria. Therapy Symptomatic therapy (eg. As cough suppressants, voice conservation, steam inhalations) For Viruslaryngitis there is no specific therapy. In acute laryngitis antitussive agent vocal conservation and inhalations help (steam baths), to relieve symptoms and speed healing. Laryngitis sometimes improves also when stopped smoking or acute or chronic bronchitis was treated properly. If a gastroesophageal reflux disease, bulimia, or drug-induced laryngitis is assumed to be the cause, and their specific treatment can be helpful.

Health Life Media Team

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