Krupp

(Laryngotracheobronchitis)

Krupp is an acute inflammation of the upper and lower respiratory tract, which is usually caused by an infection with parainfluenza virus type. 1 Its characteristics are a metal, barking cough and inspiratory stridor. The diagnosis is obvious, but can also be backed up by an anteroposterior radiograph of the neck. The treatment consists of antipyretics, hydration, nebulized epinephrine and corticosteroids. The prognosis is excellent.

Krupp mainly children diagnosed between 6 months and 3 years.

Krupp is an acute inflammation of the upper and lower respiratory tract, which is usually caused by an infection with parainfluenza virus type. 1 Its characteristics are a metal, barking cough and inspiratory stridor. The diagnosis is obvious, but can also be backed up by an anteroposterior radiograph of the neck. The treatment consists of antipyretics, hydration, nebulized epinephrine and corticosteroids. The prognosis is excellent. Krupp mainly children diagnosed between 6 months and 3 years. Etiology The most common pathogens are parainfluenza viruses, especially type 1 Less common causes include respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and adenovirus, followed by influenza A and B viruses, enterovirus, rhinovirus, measles virus and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Krupp caused by influenza, is more severe and occurs in children of different ages ago. Seasonal outbreaks are common. By parainfluenza-related cases occur especially in autumn, by RSV and influenza viruses in winter and spring. The disease is transmitted through the air or by contact with infected secretions. Pathophysiology The infection causes inflammation in the larynx, trachea, bronchi, bronchioles and lung parenchyma. Obstruction by swelling and inflamed exudate can develop and mainly affects the subglottic region. The obstruction increases the work of breathing; rarely leads to fatigue in hypercapnia. If the bronchioles are laid, atelectasis can occur simultaneously. Symptoms and complaints Krupp usually follows an infection of the upper respiratory tract. A barking, often spastic cough and hoarseness occur, especially at night; Further, a inspiratory stridor may occur. The children wake up at night with shortness of breath, tachypnea and retractions. In severe cases, when the child is tired, develop cyanosis with increasingly weak breathing. X-ray of a child with croup Image courtesy of John McBride, M.D. var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/xrays_child_croup_soft_tissue_a_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/xrays_child_croup_soft_tissue_a_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ X-ray of a child with croup ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v37898113 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eDie soft X-ray of the neck of a child with Krupp shows a narrowing of the subglottic tracheal air shadow (arrows) and dilation of the pharyngeal air spaces u003c / p u003e u003c / div u003e ‘credits’. Figure courtesy of John McBride

Health Life Media Team

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