Köhler’S Syndrome

(Kohler Bone Disease)

The Köhler’s syndrome is a navicular osteochondrosis of tarsal bone.

The Köhler’s syndrome is rare. It usually affects children from 3 to 5 years (more often boys) and occurs on one side. The foot swells and is painful, the sensitivity is over the medial longitudinal arch is greatest. Loading and running strengthen the complaints and the troubled transition. On the radiograph the os is initially naviculare flattened and sclerotic, fragmented later to see before it is reossified. Helpful are X-ray images that compare the data with the unaffected side.

The Köhler’s syndrome is a navicular osteochondrosis of tarsal bone. The Köhler’s syndrome is rare. It usually affects children from 3 to 5 years (more often boys) and occurs on one side. The foot swells and is painful, the sensitivity is over the medial longitudinal arch is greatest. Loading and running strengthen the complaints and the troubled transition. On the radiograph the os is initially naviculare flattened and sclerotic, fragmented later to see before it is reossified. Helpful are X-ray images that compare the data with the unaffected side. The disease is a chronic course, but rarely lasts longer than 2 years. Rest, pain relief and avoiding the transport of larger loads are required. The syndrome usually disappears within a few months with no long-term consequences of its own. In the acute case, a scale for a few weeks walking cast can help below the knee. It should be adapted to the longitudinal arch well.

Health Life Media Team

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