Kawasaki Disease (Mcls)

(Kawasaki disease)

The Kawasaki syndrome or mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome is a vasculitis, which sometimes involves the coronary arteries and occurs in infants and children 1 to 8 years. Characteristic are persistent fever, rash, conjunctivitis, inflammation of the mucosa and lymph node swelling. Aneurysms of the coronary arteries can occur and rupture or cause a heart attack. Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria. If the disease is diagnosed, echocardiography should be performed. The treatment consists of the administration of aspirin and intravenous immunoglobulins. Coronary thrombosis may require fibrinolysis or percutaneous angioplasty may.

Kawasaki disease (KD) is a vasculitis of medium-sized arteries, particularly the coronary arteries, which occur in approximately 20% of untreated patients. Early manifestations include acute myocarditis with heart failure, arrhythmias, and pericarditis. The aneurysms of the coronary arteries develop later. Large aneurysms of the coronary arteries (> 8 mm inner diameter in the echocardiogram) are rare but associated with a high risk of cardiac tamponade, thrombosis or infarction. The MCLS is the leading cause of acquired heart disease in children. Extravascular tissue may also be inflamed, as the upper respiratory tract, pancreas, bile ducts, kidneys, mucous membranes and lymph nodes.

The Kawasaki syndrome or mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome is a vasculitis, which sometimes involves the coronary arteries and occurs in infants and children 1 to 8 years. Characteristic are persistent fever, rash, conjunctivitis, inflammation of the mucosa and lymph node swelling. Aneurysms of the coronary arteries can occur and rupture or cause a heart attack. Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria. If the disease is diagnosed, echocardiography should be performed. The treatment consists of the administration of aspirin and intravenous immunoglobulins. Coronary thrombosis may require fibrinolysis or percutaneous angioplasty may. Kawasaki disease (KD) is a vasculitis of medium-sized arteries, particularly the coronary arteries, which occur in approximately 20% of untreated patients. Early manifestations include acute myocarditis with heart failure, arrhythmias, and pericarditis. The aneurysms of the coronary arteries develop later. Large aneurysms of the coronary arteries (> 8 mm inner diameter in the echocardiogram) are rare but associated with a high risk of cardiac tamponade, thrombosis or infarction. The MCLS is the leading cause of acquired heart disease in children. Extravascular tissue may also be inflamed, as the upper respiratory tract, pancreas, bile ducts, kidneys, mucous membranes and lymph nodes. Etiology The etiology is unknown. Epidemiological and clinical data can be the cause suspect an infection or an abnormal immune response to infection with genetically affected children. An autoimmune disease is also a possibility. The incidence among Japanese children is indeed very high, but the MCLS also occurs worldwide. In the USA, 3000-5000 cases annually. The ratio of boys to girls is 1.5 to 1. 80% of patients are <5 years, most 18 to 24 months old. Disorders in adolescents, adults and infants under 4 months are rare. The disease occurs throughout the year, occurs in spring or winter but heaped on. In some areas, a cluster of cases was reported, although no one indication of a person transmission. Approximately 2% of patients have relapses, typically months or years later. There is no known prevention. Symptoms and signs The disease progresses in spurts. It begins with a fever that lasts 5 days (usually remitting and> 39 ° C [about 102 ° F], but if it is not treated with antipyretics, never fully back it goes) along with irritability, occasionally lethargy and intermittent, colicky Stomach pain. Within 1-2 days, a bilateral conjunctival inflammation without exudation occurs. Within 5 days, a polymorphic macular rash spreads primarily from all over the body and especially in the perianal region. The rash may be urticarial, morbilliform or scarlet similar and occurs together with a reddened throat, reddened, chapped lips and a strawberry tongue. During the first week there may be a pallor of the proximal portions of the finger and toe nails (leukonychia partialis) come. Erythema or purple discoloration and variable edema of the hands and feet appear at about the third – fifth day of illness. Although the edema can be discreet, but is mostly plump, hard and not be pressed. Approximately 10 days after the start there is a periungual, palmar and plantar desquamation. The superficial layers of the skin go into shreds, among which is normal, new skin. Kawasaki disease (rash) © Springer Science + Business Media var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/418_kawasaki_disease_exanthem_slide_2_springer_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/ – / media /manual/professional/images/418_kawasaki_disease_exanthem_slide_2_springer_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0 ‘, title:’ Kawasaki disease (rash) ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v38397384 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eDiese illustration shows a polymorphic macular rash over the lower torso and especially in the perianal region. u003c / p u003e u003c / div u003e ‘credits’ © Springer Science + Business Media’

Health Life Media Team

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