Kava

Kava comes (Piper methysticum) from the root of the native to the South Pacific Regions noise pepper shrub and is drunk as a tea or taken in capsule form. Kava can be taken as a tea or in capsule form. Active ingredients may be kavalactones.

(See also nutritional supplements Overview.) Kava comes (Piper methysticum) from the root of the native to the South Pacific Regions noise pepper shrub and is drunk as a tea or taken in capsule form. Kava can be taken as a tea or in capsule form. Active ingredients may be kavalactones. The conjecture claims that kava is as an anxiolytic and sleep aid is substantiated by scientific evidence, but the mechanism of action unknown. Some people use kava in asthma, menopausal symptoms and urinary tract infections. Dosage: 100 mg of the standardized extract 3 times daily. Documents In a Cochrane Review from 2003 were evaluated 11 studies (645 participants), to evaluate the efficacy and safety of kava extract in clinical trials for the treatment of anxiety. The meta-analysis found that Kava extract versus placebo seems to be an effective way to reduce anxiety (1). This study also showed that the consumption of kava supplements for 1 to 24 weeks seems certain, but has also highlighted the need for a study on long-term safety. It is unclear how the supplements have been standardized in the meta-analysis used above. The standardization of kava supplements to the active ingredients kavalactones (3 to 20%) should be included in future clinical trials. Side effects Since 1999, several cases of hepatotoxicity (including liver failure) in Europe and the US after taking kava, the FDA has led to let muster a warning on kava products (2). Security is under continued surveillance. If kava traditionally was prepared (as a tea) and used high doses (> 6-12 g / day of dried root) or prolonged (up to 6 weeks), scaly skin rash occurred (kava dermopathy), blood changes (macrocytosis, leukopenia) and neurological disorders (torticollis, oculogyric crisis, worsening of Parkinson’s disease, motor skills / movement disorders) on. Drug interactions by Kava also the effect of other sedatives (eg. As barbiturates) may be prolonged and driving or other activities that require alertness / attention could be restricted. Information on Kava Pittler MH, Ernst E.Kava extract used to treat anxiety. Cochrane Database Syst Rev (1): CD003383, 2003. Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. Kava-Containing Dietary Supplements May Be Associated With Severe Liver Injury. US Food and Drug Administration of 2002.

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