Jejunoileal Atresia

The jejunoileal atresia is incomplete development of part of the small intestine. Diagnosis is made by radiography of the abdomen. The treatment of choice is surgical recovery.

The jejunoileal atresia is incomplete development of part of the small intestine. Diagnosis is made by radiography of the abdomen. The treatment of choice is surgical recovery.

(See also Congenital abnormalities of the gastrointestinal tract in the overview.) The jejunoileal atresia is incomplete development of part of the small intestine. Diagnosis is made by radiography of the abdomen. The treatment of choice is surgical recovery. Newborns with a jejunoilealen atresia usually show a bloated belly on the first or second day, do not have a bowel movement and eventually vomit the food. Etiology jejunoileal atresia occur as a result of an ischemic stroke during pregnancy. Ischemic stroke may be due to intussusception, perforation, volvulus, Darmstrangulation a hernia or thromboembolism. Maternal smoking and cocaine use were associated with intestinal atresia. The estimated incidence is 1 to 3 in 10,000 live births. This disease affects both sexes equally. Jejunoileal atresia be evenly distributed between the jejunum and ileum. Associated congenital anomalies are less common in Jejunoileal atresia duodenal atresia. The most common conditions for this are cystic fibrosis, malrotation, and gastroschisis, all of which are present in about 10% of cases. Peritoneal calcifications indicate the presence of meconium, which is a sign of intrauterine bowel perforation and can be seen in about 10% of cases. The presence of meconium should raise the suspicion of meconium ileus and cystic fibrosis. Classification There are at jejunoilealen atresia five main types. Type I consists of a membrane which closes the intestinal lumen completely. Type II is a gap with a fibrous structure connecting the proximal and distal segment of the intestine together. Type IIIA describes a mesenteric gap without any connection of the pieces of intestine. Type IIIB is a jejunal atresia at a missing superior mesenteric artery, the distal small intestine as a rolled apple skin and the intestinal shortened. Type IV consists of several segments atretic (similar to a string of sausages). Diagnostic X-rays of the abdomen The Abdomenleeraufnahmen show distended small bowel loops with air-fluid levels and little or no air in the colon. A barium enema is a microcolon (for non-use). Jejunal atresia © Springer Science + Business Media var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/586-jejunal-atresia-s180-springer-high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/586-jejunal-atresia-s180-springer-high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0’, title: ‘Jejunal atresia’ description: ‘ u003Ca id = ” v37897626 “class = ” anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “” para “” u003e u003cp u003eDiese radiograph of an infant with proximal jejunal atresia shows great stretched loops in the upper abdomen without distal gas. u003c / p u003e u003c / div u003e ‘credits’ © Springer Science + Business Media’

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