Informed Consent

To give consent, patients must have legal and clinical capacities. who want to get informed consent physicians must be able to give qualified information and both risks and benefits of intervention comprehensively investigate and answer appropriate questions. The law requires that doctors take reasonable steps to communicate appropriately with patients who do not speak the local language or have other problems of understanding.

The patient’s consent is a prerequisite for any medical intervention. However, this consent does not have to always be explicit. In the case of emergency care is considered a rule of a presumed consent, also called the doctrine of presumed consent. For routine procedures that are completely harmless (eg. As routine phlebotomy, placing an infusion), the circumstances imply usually a consent of the patient. For example, agree patients implicitly by stretch out her arm for the infusion. In other invasive or risky interventions, however, the explicit consent is always required. To give consent, patients must have legal and clinical capacities. who want to get informed consent physicians must be able to give qualified information and both risks and benefits of intervention comprehensively investigate and answer appropriate questions. The law requires that doctors take reasonable steps to communicate appropriately with patients who do not speak the local language or have other problems of understanding. For ethical and legal perspectives, it is imperative that physicians have an obligation to ensure that patients are aware of: your current health, including the probable course, if no treatment is potentially useful treatments, including a description and explanation of the potential risks and benefits the judgment of the practitioner about the best alternative uncertainties associated with each of these points physicians should make honest statements about the treatment effects and show how life can look after successful treatment. Generally, these educational discussions are recorded in the medical record, and a record of this conversation is signed by the patient. Although doctors are ethically obliged to provide sufficient information and make decisions in the best interest of their patients, patients have desungeachtet the right to refuse treatment. The refusal of a patient to consent to treatment is not considered a suicide attempt or can not be prosecuted for aiding and abetting suicide as reduced legal capacity, as in this case, the doctor. Rather, the later death will be legally regarded as a natural consequence of the disease itself. A rejection of care, if it may seem strange should call the doctor to initiate further discussions. If the patient’s legal capacity is questionable, they should be tested, but an assessment should not only be sought because the patient does not give its consent. However, if the refusal of treatment could harm them, such as a minor child, a sozialpsycholgische and legal advice should be sought.

Health Life Media Team

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