Inclusion Conjunctivitis In Adults

(Chlamydienkonjunktivitis the adult; swimming pool conjunctivitis)

The inclusion conjunctivitis in adults is caused by a sexually transmitted Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Symptoms include chronic unilateral hyperemia and mucopurulent secretion. The diagnosis is made clinically. Treatment consists of systemic antibiotics.

The inclusion conjunctivitis in adults is caused by Chlamydia trachomatis serotypes D to K. In most cases it is a result of sexual contact with a partner who has a genital infection. Many patients become ill within 2 months after they had found a new sexual partner. In rare cases, the inclusion conjunctivitis in adults can also be purchased through contaminated, incompletely chlorinated swimming pool water.

The inclusion conjunctivitis in adults is caused by a sexually transmitted Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Symptoms include chronic unilateral hyperemia and mucopurulent secretion. The diagnosis is made clinically. Treatment consists of systemic antibiotics. The inclusion conjunctivitis in adults is caused by Chlamydia trachomatis serotypes D to K. In most cases it is a result of sexual contact with a partner who has a genital infection. Many patients become ill within 2 months after they had found a new sexual partner. In rare cases, the inclusion conjunctivitis in adults can also be purchased through contaminated, incompletely chlorinated swimming pool water. Symptoms and complaints The inclusion conjunctivitis in adults has an incubation period of 2-19 days. Most patients have a unilateral mucopurulent secretions. The conjunctiva is on the lids often more congested than on the globe. It is characterized by a marked tarsal follicular response. Occasionally, turbidity and vascularisation can be observed in the upper part of the cornea. On the side of the affected eye preauricular lymph nodes may be swollen. Often passed the symptoms for many weeks or months without responding to local antibiotics. Diagnosis Clinical Evaluation Technical studies by their chronicity (symptoms for> 3 weeks), the mucopurulent secretions, a pronounced follicular response and the lack of response to local antibiotics, the inclusion conjunctivitis in adults of other bacterial conjunctivitis is different. It should be made swabs, bacterial cultures and tests for Chlamydia. For the detection of C. trachomatis immunofluorescent staining techniques, PCR, and special crops to be applied. Smears and Abkratzpräparate of the conjunctiva should be examined microscopically. With a Gram stain, bacteria can be detected with a Giemsa stain the characteristic basophilic cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in epithelial cells at a Chlamydienkonjunktivitis. Tips and risks When patients symptoms of bacterial conjunctivitis and a marked tarsal follicular response (often with mucopurulent secretion) have symptoms for> 3 weeks or do not respond to topical antibiotics should swabs, bacterial cultures and chlamydia tests are carried out. Therapy Oral Azithromycin or doxycycline Both conjunctivitis as well as the accompanying genital infection cure under treatment with azithromycin (single dose of 1 g po) or alternatively with doxycycline (2 times 100 mg / day po) or erythromycin (4 times 500 mg / day po) of over 1 week. The sexual partner also needs treatment.

Health Life Media Team

Leave a Reply