Herpes Simplex Virus Infection (Hsv)

(Herpes labialis, herpetic gingivostomatitis)

Herpes simplex virus (human herpes virus type 1 and 2) are common causes of recurrent infections involving the skin, mouth, lips, eyes and genitals. Frequent severe infections are for. As encephalitis, meningitis, neonatal herpes, and, in immunocompromised patients, disseminated infection. Mucocutaneous infections lead to accumulations of small painful blisters on an erythematous reddened reason. The diagnosis is made clinically; a laboratory diagnostic confirmation is possible by means of virus culture, PCR, direct immunofluorescence or serological tests. Treatment is symptomatic; antiviral therapy with acyclovir, valacyclovir or famciclovir is of major diseases and useful if it is started early, for recurrent or primary infections.

Both herpes simplex virus types (HSV-1 and HSV-2) may cause oral or genital infection. Most commonly, HSV-1 leads to a gingivostomatitis, herpes labialis and herpetic keratitis. HSV-2 usually causes genital lesions.

Herpes simplex virus (human herpes virus type 1 and 2) are common causes of recurrent infections involving the skin, mouth, lips, eyes and genitals. Frequent severe infections are for. As encephalitis, meningitis, neonatal herpes, and, in immunocompromised patients, disseminated infection. Mucocutaneous infections lead to accumulations of small painful blisters on an erythematous reddened reason. The diagnosis is made clinically; a laboratory diagnostic confirmation is possible by means of virus culture, PCR, direct immunofluorescence or serological tests. Treatment is symptomatic; antiviral therapy with acyclovir, valacyclovir or famciclovir is of major diseases and useful if it is started early, for recurrent or primary infections. Both herpes simplex virus types (HSV-1 and HSV-2) may cause oral or genital infection. Most commonly, HSV-1 leads to a gingivostomatitis, herpes labialis and herpetic keratitis. HSV-2 usually causes genital lesions. The transmission of HSV takes place through close contact with people who are actively excrete viruses. Viral shedding takes place on the lesions, but can also occur in non-apparent lesions. After the initial infection, HSV becomes latent in Spinalnervenganglien from which it can emerge again occasionally, resulting in the characteristic symptoms. Recurrent herpes outbreaks are caused by Excessive sunlight febrile illnesses Physical or emotional stress immunosuppression unknown stimuli As a rule, recurrent eruptions usually less severe and occur less and less over time. Diseases caused by herpes simplex viruses These diseases include diseases of the skin and mucous membranes (most common), including genital herpes ocular infection (herpes keratitis), CNS infection, neonatal herpes. HSV rarely leads to fulminant hepatitis in the absence of cutaneous lesions. In HIV-positive patients herpes infections may run particularly hard. There may be a progressive and persistent esophagitis to colitis, perianal ulcers, pneumonia, encephalitis and meningitis. HSV disease can subsequently lead to erythema multiforme, possibly due to an immune response against the virus. An eczema herpeticum is a complication of HSV infection in which develops a severe herpetic disease in the affected eczema skin areas. Mucocutaneous HSV infection the lesions anywhere on the skin or mucous membranes occur, but are most common in the following areas: mouth or lips (perioral infection) genitals conjunctiva and cornea Usually it comes after a prodromal phase (characteristically <6 hours at recurrent HSV-1) with tingling discomfort or itching clustered clusters of small, dense, under voltage vesicles on erythematous bases. The clusters vary in size from 0.5 to 1.5 cm, but can also coalesce. The lesions on the nose, ears, fingers or genitals can be particularly painful. The vesicles persist for a few days, then rupture and dry out, forming a thin, yellowish crust. The cure is usually within 10 to 19 days after the occurrence of primary infection or within 5 to 10 days in recurrent infections. It usually comes to a complete healing, but recurrent lesions at the same point can lead to atrophy and scarring. The skin lesions can become infected secondary bacterial. In patients with a suppressed cell-mediated immunity due to HIV infection or due to other conditions, prolonged or progressive infection for weeks or persist even longer can. Localized infections can disseminate, in particular-often dramatically-in immunocompromised patients. An acute herpes gingivostomatitis is usually based on a primary infection with HSV-1, especially in children. Herpes pharyngitis can occur in both children and adults. Occasionally it is also caused by oral-genital contact by HSV-2. Intraoral and gingival bubble rupture usually within a few hours up to 1-2 days and ulcerate. There is often fever and pain. Due to the severe food intake and drinking problems can cause dehydration. After the recovery of the viruses persist latently in the dorsal root ganglia. Herpes labialis usually provides a recurrence of HSV is he manifests in the form of ulcers ( "cold sores" fever blisters) on the vermilion border, more rarely, in the form of mucosal ulceration of the hard palate.. Herpes labialis (cold) Image courtesy of Dr. Herrmann Public Health Image Library of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. var model = {thumbnailUrl: '/-/media/manual/professional/images/1573_herpes_labialis_lip_public_health_image_library_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350' imageUrl: '/-/media/manual/professional/images/1573_herpes_labialis_lip_public_health_image_library_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ', title:' herpes labialis (cold) 'description:' u003Ca id = "v38396506 " class = ""anchor "" u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = ""para "" u003e u003cp u003eDies is a closeup of a HSV-1 lesion on the lower lip

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