Herpes Simplex Keratitis

(Herpes simplex keratoconjunctivitis)

The herpetic keratitis is a corneal infection with the herpes simplex virus. It can involve the iris. Symptoms and complaints are foreign body sensation, epiphora, photophobia, and conjunctival hyperemia. Recurrences are common and can be used hypoesthesia, cause ulceration and permanent scarring of the cornea. Diagnosis is based on the characteristic dendritic corneal ulcer and sometimes viral culture. Treated, it is local and occasionally systemic antiviral drugs.

Herpes simplex usually affects the corneal surface and sometimes the corneal stroma concerns (the deeper layers of the cornea). The Mitbeteilugung the stroma is probably an immunological response to the virus.

The herpetic keratitis is a corneal infection with the herpes simplex virus. It can involve the iris. Symptoms and complaints are foreign body sensation, epiphora, photophobia, and conjunctival hyperemia. Recurrences are common and can be used hypoesthesia, cause ulceration and permanent scarring of the cornea. Diagnosis is based on the characteristic dendritic corneal ulcer and sometimes viral culture. Treated, it is local and occasionally systemic antiviral drugs. Herpes simplex usually affects the corneal surface and sometimes the corneal stroma concerns (the deeper layers of the cornea). The Mitbeteilugung the stroma is probably an immunological response to the virus. As with all herpes simplex virus infections (herpes simplex virus infection (HSV)), there is a primary infection, followed by a latent phase in which the virus goes into the nerve roots. Latent virus can be reactivated, leading to recurrent symptoms. Symptoms and complaints primary infection The initial (primary) infection is usually a non-specific, self-limiting conjunctivitis, often in early childhood and usually without the involvement of the cornea. If the cornea is involved, early symptoms include a foreign body sensation, epiphora, photophobia, and conjunctival hyperemia. Sometimes a vesicular blepharitis follows (blisters on the eyelid), the symptoms increase, the vision is poor, ulcerate the bubbles and heal after a week without scarring ab.Rezidivierende infection recurrences occur mostly in the form of epithelial keratitis (dendritic keratitis as referred to) – with epiphora, foreign body sensation and a characteristic lesion of the corneal epithelium, s) resembles a branched branch (dendritic or serpentine manner with button-shaped ends which can be stained with fluorescein. Multiple recurrences may lead to hypo- or anesthesia, ulceration and permanent scarring of the cornea. Herpes simplex (dendritic keratitis) Image courtesy of Prof. H. J. Meyer via the Online Journal of Ophthalmology (www.onjoph.com). var model = {thumbnailUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/herpes_simplex_dendritic_keratitis_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350’ imageUrl: ‘/-/media/manual/professional/images/herpes_simplex_dendritic_keratitis_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ‘, title:’ herpes simplex (dendritic keratitis) ‘description:’ u003Ca id = “v37894228 ” class = “”anchor “” u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = “”para “” u003e u003cp u003eDendritische (epithelial) keratitis is characterized by branched epithelial defects of the cornea similar to those of the branch of a tree. This is best seen in the fluorescein staining u003c / p u003e u003c / div u003e ‘credits’. Image courtesy of Prof. H. J. Meyer via the Online Journal of Ophthalmology (www.onjoph.com) ‘hideCredits: false

Health Life Media Team

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