Gingivitis

Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gingiva, which sometimes leads to bleeding with swelling, redness, exudation, alteration of the normal contours and mild pain. The diagnosis is based on the investigation. Treatment includes a professional dental cleaning and intensified oral hygiene. In advanced cases antibiotics or surgery may be required.

Normally, the gums (gingiva) firm, tight-fitting to the teeth and tapering contoured in the interdental region. The keratinized gingiva near the crowns is a pink, speckled fabric. This tissue should the entire space between the tooth crowns fill (papilla). The gingiva further away from the crowns, the so-called alveolar mucosa is not keratinized, well supplied with blood, red, mobile and passes into the buccal mucosa. With a tongue holder should be able to push out from normal gingiva no blood or pus.

Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gingiva, which sometimes leads to bleeding with swelling, redness, exudation, alteration of the normal contours and mild pain. The diagnosis is based on the investigation. Treatment includes a professional dental cleaning and intensified oral hygiene. In advanced cases antibiotics or surgery may be required. Normally, the gums (gingiva) firm, tight-fitting to the teeth and tapering contoured in the interdental region. The keratinized gingiva near the crowns is a pink, speckled fabric. This tissue should the entire space between the tooth crowns fill (papilla). The gingiva further away from the crowns, the so-called alveolar mucosa is not keratinized, well supplied with blood, red, mobile and passes into the buccal mucosa. With a tongue holder should be able to push out from normal gingiva no blood or pus. The inflammation or gingivitis, the most common gum problem can develop into periodontitis. Etiology gingivitis can be caused by plaque (due to poor oral hygiene) Non-plaque-induced gingivitis is Almost every plaque induced. Poor oral hygiene allows the accumulation of plaque between teeth and gums (gingivitis does not occur in edentulous areas on). The irritation caused by plaque deepens the normal gap (sulcus) between the tooth and the gingiva and creates the gingival pockets. These bags contain bacteria that can cause both gingivitis root caries. Other local factors, such as malocclusion, tartar, Speiseimpaktion, faulty dental restorations, and xerostomia play a secondary role. Plaque-induced gingivitis can by hormonal changes brought about systemic diseases, medications or nutritional deficiencies or worsens. Hormonal changes that occur at puberty, during the menstrual cycle and pregnancy and menopause, or which can aggravate due to oral (or injectable) contraceptives inflammation. Systemic disorders (eg., Diabetes, AIDS, vitamin deficiency, leukemia, leukopenia) can affect the response to infection. Some patients with Crohn’s disease have a cobblestone-like area of ??a granulomatous gingival hypertrophy when acute intestinal flare-ups occur. Drugs such as cyclosporine and nifedipine and serious defects (rare in the US) of niacin (caused pellagra) or vitamin C (caused scurvy) can cause gingivitis. Contact with heavy metals (eg. As lead, bismuth) may cause gingivitis and a dark line at the gingival margin. Non-plaque-induced gingivitis occurs in a small percentage of people. Causes include bacterial, viral and fungal infections, allergic reactions, trauma, mucocutaneous disorders (eg. As lichen planus, pemphigoid) and hereditary diseases (eg. As hereditary gingival fibromatosis). The symptoms and complaints simple gingivitis initially causes depression of the sulcus between the tooth and the gingiva, and then the formation of a band of red, inflamed gingiva along one or more teeth, with swelling of the interdental papillae and easy-released bleeding. Pain usually missing. The inflammation can heal, remain limited for years superficial or continue occasionally to periodontitis. A pericoronitis is an acute, painful inflammation of the gingival flap (operculum) above a partially erupted teeth that normally to the 3rd molars (wisdom teeth) occurs around. Infection is common and may be an abscess or peritonsillitis develop. The Pericoronitis often occurs again stay if food particles get under the cloth and stuck there. The gingival flaps disappear when the tooth is fully erupted. Many wisdom teeth do not break through and are called impacted. During menopause, a desquamative gingivitis may occur. It is characterized by deep red, painful gum tissue that bleeds easily. Desquamation can be preceded by bubbles. The gingiva is soft because the keratinized cells are absent, that resist abrasion by food particles. A similar Gingivaläsion may be associated with pemphigus vulgaris, bullous pemphigoid, benign mucous membrane or atrophic lichen planus. During pregnancy, often swelling occurs particularly the papillae. Soft, reddish stalked gingival enlargement often form during the first trimester of pregnancy in the papillae; they can persist throughout pregnancy and regress after birth or not. Such growths are pyogenic granulomas, which are sometimes called pregnancy tumors. They develop quickly and then come to a stop. Often there is an underlying irritation such as tartar or a rough edge filling. These growths can also occur in non-pregnant women and men. A non-controlled diabetes may increase the effect of stimuli at the gum line and increase the frequency of secondary infections and acute Zahnfleischabszessen. In leukemia the gingiva may swell by a leukemic infiltrate and show clinical symptoms in the form of edema, pain and light-released bleeding. In scurvy the gums are inflamed, hyperplastic, swollen and bleed easily. Throughout the mouth petechiae and bruising may occur. In pellagra the gingiva is inflamed, bleeding easily and susceptible to secondary infections. In addition, the lips are red and cracked, his mouth is burning, the tongue is smooth and light red, and on the tongue and oral mucosa ulceration can occur. Diagnosis Clinical evaluation erythematous, friable tissue at the gingival margin confirms the diagnosis of gingivitis. For early detection of gingival disease some dentists frequently measure the depth of the pockets around the individual teeth. Depths <3 mm are normal; deeper pockets mean a high risk of gingivitis and periodontal disease. Gingivitis figure provided by Jonathan A. Ship, D.M.D. var model = {thumbnailUrl: '/-/media/manual/professional/images/gingivitis_high_de.jpg?la=de&thn=0&mw=350' imageUrl: '/-/media/manual/professional/images/gingivitis_high_de.jpg?la = en & thn = 0 ', title:' gingivitis 'description:' u003Ca id = "v37894099 " class = ""anchor "" u003e u003c / a u003e u003cdiv class = ""para "" u003e u003cp u003eDie inflammatory reaction at gingivitis is characterized by redness and edema u003c / p u003e u003c / div u003e. 'credits' image provided by Jonathan A. ship DMD'

Health Life Media Team

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