Ginger

Ginger root (Zingiber officinale) is extracted and manufactured in tablet form or may be fresh, dried or used as the juice or oil. Active ingredients are gingerols, which give the ginger the typical taste and smell, and shogaols.

(See also nutritional supplements Overview.) Ginger root (Zingiber officinale) is extracted and manufactured in tablet form or may be fresh, dried or as juice or oil. Active ingredients are gingerols, which give the ginger the typical taste and smell, and shogaols. Ginger claims to be an effective antiemetic especially with nausea as part of a movement / motion sickness or pregnancy and also relieve intestinal cramps. Ginger is also used as anti-inflammatories and analgesics. Evidence to the antibacterial action properties and the antiplatelet effect of ginger in vitro are contradictory. Meta-analyzes indicate possible benefits of ginger in the control of post-operative (1) and pregnancy-related (2) nausea and vomiting out but no benefit for chemotherapy-induced (3) nausea and vomiting. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of ginger are less well supported. However, a review of eight studies (481 participants) suggests a potential anti-inflammatory effect out can reduce the pain in some conditions, such as osteoarthritis (4). Side effects of ginger is not usually harmful, although some people have a burning sensation when they eat it. Nausea, indigestion (dyspepsia) and dysgeusia are possible. Interactions with drugs is contraindicated ginger principle for patients with bleeding tendency (diathesis) or with simultaneous administration of antiplatelet drugs or warfarin. Note to Ginger Chaiyakunapruk N, N Kitikannakorn, Nathisuwan S, et al. The efficacy of ginger for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting: a meta-analysisAm J Obstet Gynecol194 (1): 95-99, 2006. Matthews A, Dowswell T, Haas DM, et al. Interventions for nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy. Cochrane Database Syst Rev (9): CD007575, 2010. Lee J, Oh Ginger H. as to antiemetic modality for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Oncol Nurs Forum40 (2): 163-170, 2013. Terry R, ??Posadzki P, Watson LK, et al. The use of ginger (Zingiber officinale) for the treatment of pain: a systematic review of clinical trials. Pain Med 12 (12): 1808-1818., 2011

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