Gastrointestinal Barotrauma

Small amounts of air, which are swallowed in diving, can expand (gastrointestinal barotrauma), which usually causes self-limiting symptoms during ascent.

In network snooping breathing through a regulator or with the use of ear and sinus pressure balancing techniques, it may happen that divers swallow small amount of air in a diving operation. This air expands during ascent, causing abdominal bloating, cramps, pain, belching and flatulence; these symptoms are self-limiting and do not require any further clarification. A rupture is rare; it is recognizable by severe abdominal pain and guarding.

Small amounts of air, which are swallowed in diving, can expand (gastrointestinal barotrauma), which usually causes self-limiting symptoms during ascent. In network snooping breathing through a regulator or with the use of ear and sinus pressure balancing techniques, it may happen that divers swallow small amount of air in a diving operation. This air expands during ascent, causing abdominal bloating, cramps, pain, belching and flatulence; these symptoms are self-limiting and do not require any further clarification. A rupture is rare; it is recognizable by severe abdominal pain and guarding. If signs of gastrointestinal rupture available immediately radiographs of the chest upright or a CT scan must be prepared to demonstrate free air. Mild symptoms do not require testing. Patients with gastrointestinal rupture require a vigorous fluid therapy, broad-spectrum antibiotics and immediate surgical performance with considering an exploratory laparotomy. For more information Divers Alert Network: 24-hour emergency hotline, 919-684-9111

Health Life Media Team

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